Ian Alexander Moore: Eckhart, Heidegger, and the Imperative of Releasement, SUNY Press, 2019

Eckhart, Heidegger, and the Imperative of Releasement Couverture du livre Eckhart, Heidegger, and the Imperative of Releasement
SUNY series in Contemporary Continental Philosophy
Ian Alexander Moore
SUNY Press
2019
Hardback $95.00
352

Edward S. Casey: The World on Edge

The World on Edge Couverture du livre The World on Edge
Edward S. Casey
Indiana University Press
2017
Paperback $42.00
385

Reviewed by: Lance Gracy (The University of Texas-San Antonio)

Introduction

Following his book on the phenomenology of borders, in Up Against the Wall: Re-imagining the U.S.-Mexico Border (Austin: University of Texas Press, 2014), Edward Casey discusses relevant topics in, The World on Edge. Readers, in particular those readers sympathetic to peri-phenomenological methods to doing philosophy, are provided with refreshing insight into the world constituted by edges of metaphysical, ontological and phenomenological significance. In his book, Casey takes preoccupation with a description of the role of edges in the world. Indeed, what are edges? What is the significance of them? Casey’s pursues “the thesis that edges are constitutive not only of what we perceive, but also of what we think and of the places and events in which we are situated” (xiii). In this context, edges are not merely things worthy of storing, reflecting upon, or collecting; rather, they are “distinct presences” that are “essential to being a thing or thought” (xiii). According to Casey, edges play a dramatic role. As the drama of the world unfolds, edges “act” as a presence of being to “cut a dramatic figure” into not only our perception, but our thoughts as well (xiv). In the prelude to his book, Casey provides an image of an edge-of-presence, and by means of it we come to realize what Casey is after in his description of edges as “distinct presence.” In the given image, we see a mountain-edge cutting through light and darkness, along with a description of the edge, as if the edge itself had some poetic presence “to be light! And to thirst for the nightly!” (Nietzsche, 1999, 70-1). But Casey’s description of edges is more fundamental than poetics. He provides us with a description of edges as enantiodromia, Heraclitus’s word for the “sudden reversal into the opposite” (xvii). Accordingly, Casey gives us a description of enantiodromia as the “line of flight”, or in Deleuze and Guattari’s sense of the term, as a “quasi-linear structure that is inherently mobile rather than fixed” (xviii). Casey refers to this sort of edge as the “ultimate edge of our life”, which “bears up and bears out” what it edges (xv). At any rate, edges of this sort are related to dramatic experiences; that is to say, they compare and contrast world events, such as those of politics, or as Casey mentions specifically, the 2016 American presidential race, Tahrir square, and numerous other dramatic events—even our own death (xvii). As we see, reflect, perceive, and consider, we contemplate the “role of edges” as something of experienced dramatically “at every level” (xiii). What more is there to edges?

Summary

Casey is preoccupied with the question of “whether edges are something … or nothing—or perhaps next to nothing” (xvii). Assuming edges are something or next to nothing, what is the presence of an edge? How do we describe the presence of a world “on edge”? In relation to his primary thesis, Casey pursues “exact description of edges in four ways” (xviii). In part one, he examines “borders and boundaries”; he also examines “edges and limits, edges and surfaces, as well as distinctive sorts of edges that pertain to places and limits” (xix). In part two, he compares “naturally given and humanly constructed edges”, which are edges experienced in “wilderness” and “constructed environments” (ibid). In part three, Casey considers the edges of bodies “psychical rather than physical” (ibid). Taking the three descriptive ways into a phenomenological whole, Casey aims to describe edges pervading “our inner as well as our outer lives” and also “how they arise in the interaction between human beings and what surrounds them: in bodies and minds, things on the earth and sights in the sky” (ibid). Casey’s description of edges is a totalizing one; it takes into account the very nature of edges as that which is constitutive of our own phenomenological experience(s). In relation to Chalmers and others, Casey’s edges are constitutive presences, which are realized through description of them as a “pure phenomenal concept” and as essential to thoughts and things. According to Casey, this “pure phenomenal concept” is peri-phenomenological. His peri-phenomenology is a method of “exact description” of edges as a ‘being-around’ “ostensibly peripheral phenomena” (xix). Fair to say, Casey’s phenomenological approach to edges is one of “risk-taking.” Wondrously enough though, this risk-taking approach, or this peri-phenomenological approach, is precisely what one would experience if they were to “walk” the edge.

In chapter one, Casey introduces us to “borders and boundaries” concerning an exact description of edges. Casey’s description of edge as border and boundary amplifies the notion of Edith Stein’s “metaleptic communion” as the sense of unity and distinction between two concepts of being (even radically different concepts of being), such as that of ‘light’ and ‘darkness’ (Calcagno, 2009, 51). Invoking Husserl’s passage in Ideas I of “Descriptive and Exact Science”, Casey forms a synthetic idea about borders and borders through distinction of irregular and non-irregular (or eidetic) shapes (9). Here, the thought is that borders or boundaries (in relation to edges) constitute irregular shapes, and according to Husserl (and apparently Casey), these edges require a phenomenological description. In other words, because edges are not necessarily Euclidean, Casey calls for a peri-phenomenology of edges, as borders and boundaries, to describe the way in which we make sense of edges constituting some irregular shape or object. Walking us through a series of examples about the distinction between irregular (descriptive) and non-irregular (exact science) constitution, Casey states, “[B]oundaries, although nonlinear in their alliance with natural features, can be represented by linear means—where ‘represented’ means literally given representation, as if delegated to do so” (14). In this context, the explicit non-linearness of edges as borders and boundaries can be represented in terms of linearality. Thus, even irregular borders and boundaries can be represented in linear means—thus a sense of mathematical functionality to them—thus a sense of rationality to them. At any rate, “Borders and boundaries possess a special force or power” and the edges essential to their force or power have a variety of distinct purposes (16-7). One such power or force is the way edges as borders and boundaries “intertangle” themselves in our own thinking because of the variety of expressions involved with them (23-4). For example, an edge bordering two univocal expressions of light might “intertangle” us into a contemplative state. Casey clues us in to how we can rid ourselves of such intertanglement, by stating, “[I]n descriptive fact, the matter is more complex and more interesting. To admit this [intertanglement] is not to descend into descriptive taxonomic chaos; [to admit this intertanglement] is to discern an abiding order in the midst of complexity. Even as embodying several sorts of edge, a given edge will as a rule exemplify one primary or most salient form of edge” (24, emphasis mine). Casey’s clue here is a road into the dramatic role of “borders and boundaries” because it gives us a key for understanding how two distinct, yet univocally related beings, are related to each other. He provides the key thus: two distinct, yet univocally related, beings are related to each by the “most salient form of edge” that provides an “abiding order in the midst of complexity.” One’s concern about how two distinct beings related to each other is more importantly set in the essential thought of their distinct relation: i.e., the salient edge, or form, between them.

In continuing the first part of his exact description of edges, Casey identifies “distinctive sorts of edges that pertain to places and limits” (xix). He provides us with a depiction of ‘edge’ in relation to surface, thing and place (40). After a thorough analysis of ‘surface’, Casey offers a proposition as follows, “The edge is all but the shadow of the surface” (43). Moreover, neither edge nor surface are substances in themselves, but rather expressions of the substance. The edge is essential to the substance, and the surface, as Merleau-Ponty wrote, is “the surface of a depth, [of] a cross section upon a massive being” (44). As we understand Casey, a distinctive edge, when ensconced in the meaning of ‘limit’, is that which is in relation to a depth-of-being, some thing, or some substance. Casey further writes that this distinctive edge is not “wholly immaterial or insubstantial”, and that it becomes a surface by relation to the surface (44). Similar to Husserl’s notion of ‘phantom’, distinctive edges becoming surfaces are often “left out of consideration” in their “capacity to exercise” causality (Sokolowski, 1974, 95-6). Furthermore, in section nine of chapter one, Casey offers a distinction of edge and limit. He states, “Edges are primus inter pares, first among what is otherwise equal in the playing field constituted by limits and edges … they are neither fully present nor strictly absent” (55-6). On the other hand, limits “exist elsewhere than in the immediately surrounding world of places to which we belong as sentient creatures” (55). Edges, as distinct from limits, “join the company of certain other phenomena that exhibit a like ambiguity of presence: [e.g.,] the human body (as Merleau-Ponty insists in his discussion of the phantom limb phenomenon), and the human face (emphasized in Levinas’s ethics)” but in contrast “limits are forever beyond ‘the bounds of sense,’ whereas edges emerge from within these bounds and help to concretize and complicate what appears there, even as they also mark its very evanescence” (56). To summarize here: edges constitute beings, such as things or thoughts, by their presence, but they are not beings-in-themselves; and distinctive edges emerge from limits, and can be spoken of thus: as distinctive edges that help concretize and complicate beings (or substances). So although edges are themselves not concrete, by relation to concrete beings they can help concretize beings (or substances).

Continuing Casey’s “exact description”, we come to part two, in which he provides an analysis of “naturally given and humanly constructed edges”, which are edges experienced in “wilderness” and “constructed environments” (xix). Casey begins here with what he considers to be “intermediate edges” (184). Casey identifies intermediate edges as edges that are mixed in with the wild and “the cultivated and artifactual,” and are furthermore expressed through what Foucault called heterotopias; i.e., “other places” (185-6). Intermediate edges have a certain compresence within both inclusive environments (e.g., those of Carthusian monks) and exclusive environments (e.g., those of dog-parks) (187). Casey discusses the naturally-free and flowing structure or environmental identity of intermediate edges as settings which grant humans and animals a certain capacity to walk and move unrestricted, wherein is experienced a “balance of spirit and humility” (187-88). One of the grand settings Casey uses to exemplify a setting constituted by intermediate edges is Central Park. He describes Central Park as “a vast heterogeneous multiplicity whose constituent elements exist at many scales: human, more-than-human, other-than-human” as well as an environment that “would count as ‘a plane of consistency’,” which is what Deleuze and Guattari’s termed “a region whose considerable diversity is coherent despite all the differences in kind, level, and number” (190). Edges constituting spaces or settings like Central Park invite us to have “bold imagination,” or what the Greeks called “greatness of soul” (megalopsychia) (190). They also invite us to new life, vita nuova (191). In what could be a mighty recompense for the inactive days of post-industrial British poetic imagination, Casey actively describes the intelligence of environments constructed by both Mother Nature and human ingenuity. The intelligence is the edginess of the construct: Is this not itself an ‘edgy-idea’ essential to Dasein?

Neighborhoods are also examples of what Casey has in mind about a description of “naturally given and humanly constructed edges” (xix). Neighborhoods give us a sense of community, especially if we understand how neighborhoods are places and/or communities constituted by edges. In reference to what Casey writes, neighborhoods are constituted by edged-places, which, according to Husserl, are each a “near-sphere”; or according to Heidegger, each is a “nearness” (195). On page 196, Casey gives us an image of a neighborhood as some kind of neural highway having various functions—various edged-places that are constitutive of an edged-boundary, which is, “the neighborhood” itself. Casey lists “meeting places”, “gateways”, and areas of “restricted access” as examples of these edged-places (196). According to Casey, the neighborhood is where the magic happens; it is essential to beings; beings get their thoughts and feeling about other beings from it (198-99). As such, we return to Casey’s notion of edges: they are essential to a thing or thought—in particular, the thing or thought of “neighborhood.” Casey concludes his discussion of intermediate edges, or edges naturally given as well as humanly constructed, by stating, “Each edge is transitional, none is ultimate. But taken together, all such edges constitute a city as anything but static—as an ever-evolving interplay of edges. In cities, the edge is where the action is … Every city is first and last—and at many points in between—an edge city” (204). We could do well to be denizens of such a city: a city “on edge.”

Casey’s penultimate part of his book, part three, “Edges of Body and Psyche, Earth and Sky” explores a whole phenomenology of “the world on edge.” It might well be described as a phenomenology of being as a bodily-boundary that lives within the bodily or non-bodily boundaries of the kosmos. He states, “My body is an earth body, and the earth is inhabited by living bodies, not only mine and not only human bodies but those of all other living beings as well” (298). One question that arouses much curiosity, which is really at the center of the philosophical task of his book, is, as Casey states, “whether there are specifically psychical edges—edges of states of mind, of moods, of feelings, of thoughts. Do they really exist?” (236). Casey provides an altogether practical case for the existence of psychical edges. He states as follows, “However tempting it is to regard exemplary cases of having an edge as physical, this does not preclude the possibility of genuinely psychical edges—that is, edges that belong to soul … in their own right. And more than just the possibility! Psychical edges are altogether actual insofar as they are feltfelt by us directly” (237). Suffice it to say that Casey is not alone in his general argument for psychical edges. We needn’t look further than Cartesian dualism or the Meinongian idea of mental content having qualia to realize that “psychical edges” have traction in the traditional philosophical canon. It is at the very least an entertaining notion that edges are not merely physical and purely literal, but also psychical and non-literal. And Casey goes further. He gives a two-fold distinction about psychical edges: (1) outer psychical edges and (2) inner psychical edges (240-41). Casey provides an explanation of the language we can use to discuss these aspects of psychical edges (e.g., language within the concept of “falling apart” during mental breakdowns, pp. 242-46). Notwithstanding, Casey tells us, that, “The self clearly has to have some minimal unity to be considered as split from itself” (257). From this idea we return to Edith Stein’s “metaleptic communion”: although edges are inside and outside, there is at the very least a minimal sense of unity between two aspects of ‘edge’. This brings us to one possible purpose of Casey’s description of edges in his penultimate part of the book: to reveal to us the grandeur of edges as that which constitute our life inside and outside; our life within and without. There is something worth critiquing about Casey’s analysis. Casey’s suggests that there is a need to distinguish the unitary from formal unity (260). He provides a few reasons as to why he thinks there is a need to distinguish the two: one reason is that formal unity is “fixed and static in character” and another reason is that, “Unlike formal unities, the psychically unitary cannot be quantified” (261). There are a few questions we can ask about this seemingly strange need to distinguish the unitary from formal unity. As to the first question, is formal unity “fixed and static in character” necessarily? It would seem formal unity is not “fixed and static in character” necessarily. As to the second question, why can’t the “psychically unitary” be quantified? It would seem the “psychically unitary” can be quantified somehow. We can imagine Casey has a response to these questions in his inner-psychical edge.

In the latter end of his penultimate section of The World on Edge, Casey provides us with a description of edges in relation to the earth and the kosmos. These sorts of edges are multitudinous: edges near and far from us; edges that lead into the underworld; found edges and edges of horizon and landscape; edges under our feet and edges above our heads (i.e., “comparative luminescence”); edges of the earth and the edge of the earth (278-284). In distinguishing between “edges of” and “the edge of” the earth, or what we can term particular-universals and the universal, Casey states as follows,

[S]everal of [the “edges of the earth”] we see directly, as determinate features of our environment. They are  already there, awaiting our discovery and perception and measurement. Unlike the horizon or the ground, they are always multiple, belonging to this protuberance here or that rill over there. Whether they are  sought out or not, they come forward into our experience as configuring the surface of the earth. By  contrast, the edge of the earth is fugitive and recessive. It is neither a thing nor an event; it is fundamental  yet intermittently experienced, sometimes confronting us but just as often eluding us…” (281).

And interestingly, “the edge of the earth” can be experienced as something quite elusive. It is, as Casey tells us, “a situation of elemental obscurum per obscurius, being made ‘obscure by the more obscure’;” yet, ironically, “edges of the earth” can be, according to Casey, “edges of unclearly presented entities [that] tend … to be unclear” (287). Do we wonder about the outermost edge? Are we like Heraclitus looking up into the Heavens at the cost of practical awareness? As we wonder, do we come up with an answer about this outermost edge? Casey gives us an interesting conundrum to try and solve our wondering of the outermost edge. Turning to the medieval conundrum of the javelin thrower, he asks, “Into what does he throw his spear, if he is himself situated on the outer-most edge of the known universe?” (288). Referencing Kant, Casey provides us with this sort of answer to the conundrum: “[T]hought without content is empty, and speculative thinking on its own ends in impasse” (289). In other words, the outer-most edge is not an empty thought, but speculative thinking only will only burden us more. So try, if you wish, to answer the conundrum, but know when to stop!

At any rate, Casey reaches his conclusive edge: the human being’s paradigmatic edge, their ultimate edge: Death, “beyond which there is no other” (343). Casey’s understanding of death constitutes paradoxical meanings about the psychical and psychical, such as his term “living death” (i.e., civic and social death), and “biological death” (344-45). In addition, Casey’s “ultimate edge of death” is one way of blending the psychical and psychical into one coherent meaning: “the final edge of life!” This edge is a border and boundary of the human condition, and it “cannot be reversed or crossed back over” (344). In this context, edges surely “cut a dramatic figure” into human existence, for edges “cut-around” the meaning of the body as it approaches its end, its “ultimate edge”, its autopsy (so to speak). Casey reveals to us that even though there are edges of thoughtful consideration, or those of pure speculation conducive to our curiosity, how much more curious and contemplative should we be about the ultimate “razor-edge” of our life: our very death! An old proverbial wisdom speaks keenly here: Indeed, the wise one thinks much of the Heavens, but they also they think much of death!

In summary, Casey calls his way of proceeding in his book “peri-phenomenology” (300). As Casey tells us, edges are precarious. Given that edges are associated with “risk”, peri-phenomenology is an apt way to go about edges carefully because peri-phenomenology does just that: it moves about contextual surroundings, which is, in certain cases, context-sensitive edges. What’s more: Casey appears to do exactly what he intended to do with his thesis through his peri-phenomenological approach: an “exact description” of edges. Peri-phenomenology is indeed the force from which Casey’s work appears outstanding. His thorough and rigorous exact description releases some precious nuggets of philosophical wisdom—wisdom beckoning to us take heed of the progressive revelations of our day. Surely, Casey’s book is a worthy testament to the burdensome undertaking of “edge-walking” amidst present-day global issues—in particular, the edge-walking amidst the pitfalls of political, societal, and even academic, issues. Casey’s understanding of “edge-walking” in this context is a precise sort of wisdom. He states as follows,

“What I have called the edge-world is not only a world composed of intricate patterns and permutations of edges; it is also a world that is itself on edge. As a consequence, each of us is pitched on a thousand edges—edges on which we shake and tremble even as we pretend to go about our lives undisturbed. Our equanimity is only skin-deep; underneath it the abysses gape open, not just at the far edge of the known world or at the base of a precipice. We are denizens of a world on edge, and we are ourselves creatures of exposed edges. This is not just a matter of being accident-prone or vulnerable as individuals. We carry risk to others, endangering their lives as well as our own. Whole populations of human beings have been decimated by their fellow humans. Many animal and bird species have been rendered extinct because of human actions in the Anthropocene. Now we are on the verge of making ourselves extinct if humanly induced climate change takes its full vengeance. There is no way to exist on earth, no alternative path, other than to follow the edges that guide us even as they expose us to risk at every turn. We must take such exposure into account, learning how to identify those edges that are likely to lead us astray: each of us exists on a perpetual visual cliff. Some edges bring us to an unwelcome fate for which we are not adequately prepared: on these I have focused in this epilogue. Instead of trying to forget them or merely regret them, we must think on them, reflecting on what they portend. Becoming wary of certain edges, we can come to trust other edges that will configure our life-worlds in ways that are both more constructive and more creative. These more auspicious edges point the way for us, incisively even if not infallibly. Thoughtfully traversed, they are able to liberate us, indicating directions with the potential to save us from our own destructive and self-destructive ventures” (351).

Able to liberate us, and able to give great meaning to life as well! Certainly, edges are essential to human beings, and they play a dramatic role. Of course, we can offer a critique of Casey’s work in the form of stating that there ought to be an answer as to why there is a “need to distinguish” formal unity from the unitary. Casey’s line of reasoning doesn’t seem to evince in us a sufficient reason as to why there is a need for such a distinction (as noted earlier in this review), but this critique doesn’t bear on the high performance and outstanding nature of Casey’s work. The critique is rather some pleasing outcome of Casey’s peri-phenomenological approach; and, in addition, it points out an interesting topic of discussion (e.g., formal unity vs. the unitary). In closing, I conclude by stating that Casey provides us with a refreshing and reinvigorating analysis of the world, The World on Edge. His book is a masterful ode to phenomenology, for it encourages phenomenologists to benefit from a seemingly neglected approach to phenomenology: peri-phenomenology. The methodology of it is a beneficial one, as it is capable of navigating numerous closely-related topics in “exact description.” With no serious doubt, Edward Casey has achieved something remarkable with his book, The World on Edge. Philosophers are hereby encouraged to read it, lest they lose their confidence to “walk the edge”!

References: 

Nietzsche, Friederich. 1999. Thus Spake Zarathustra. New York: Dover Publications: 70-1. Print. (Original published, 1883).

Sokolowski, Robert. 1974. Husserlian Meditations. US: Northwestern University Press: 95-6.  Print.

Calcagno, Antonio (2009). The Philosophy of Edith Stein. Pennsylvania: Duquesne University Press: 51. Print.

Alexander Schnell: Wirklichkeitsbilder

Wirklichkeitsbilder Couverture du livre Wirklichkeitsbilder
Philosophische Untersuchungen 40
Alexander Schnell
Mohr Siebeck
2015
Paperback 54,00 €
XII, 223

Reviewed by: Fabian Erhardt (Bergische Universität Wuppertal)

Zu Beginn des 21. Jahrhunderts haben zahlreiche Impulse der Phänomenologie in Theorien des Bewusstseins, der Kognition, der Emotion und der sozialen Koexistenz Einzug gehalten. Husserls explizites Programm, wonach Phänomenologie transzendentale Philosophie sei, erfährt meist eine tendenziell „stiefmütterliche“ Behandlung. So lange die Phänomenologie dank ihrer leistungsfähigen Deskriptionen zu einer präziseren Stilisierung unserer epistemischen Ausgangslage und ihrer Implikationen beiträgt, sehen auch „naturalistische“ Verwender ihres begrifflichen organon großzügig über ihre „idealistischen“ Vermessenheiten hinweg. Doch die Zeit einer Marginalisierung ihres erkenntnislegitimierenden Anspruchs scheint vorbei – das „Transzendentale“ ist wieder ein aktuelles Diskussionsthema in der Phänomenologie, das „spekulative Format der Philosophie“ noch nicht überall zugunsten einer „Sensibilität für sanfte commitments“ (Wolfram Hogrebe) oder reiner „Archäologien von Sinn- und Seinsverständnissen“ (Sophie Loidolt) verabschiedet. Statt wie zahlreiche PhänomenologInnen Zugeständnisse an die Kritiker der transzendentalen Ausrichtung der Phänomenologie zu machen, wählt Alexander Schnell zur Vorstellung seiner „generativen Phänomenologie“ eine offensive wie eigenständige Strategie: Gerade die Radikalisierung ihres transzendentalen Anspruchs am Leitfaden einer konsequenten Kritik der Allgemeingültigkeit der Aktintentionalität soll im Kontext gegenwärtiger Philosophie-Diskurse ihre argumentativen Ressourcen verdeutlichen.

Wie also „die Welt als konstituierten Sinn konkret verständlich zu machen“ (Hua I, 164)? Ausgangspunkt des Ansatzes ist eine doppelte Perspektivierung des Phänomenbegriffs. Gewöhnlich adressiert Husserl das Phänomen als „das reine Erleben als Tatsache“ (Hua XXXV, 77), also als das Faktum des Erscheinens von Gegebenheiten für das Bewusstsein, samt deren reflexiv aufweisbaren Implikationen (Abschattung, Apperzeption, Protention, Retention, Auffassung/Auffassungsinhalt, etc.). Er stößt aber – vor allem in den Manuskripten zum inneren Zeitbewusstsein und zur passiven Synthesis – auf „Tatsachen […], die sich nicht in einem anschaulichen konstitutiven Prozess aufzeigen lassen“ (5). Solche „Grenzfakten“ verweisen auf „fungierende Leistungen“, welche das Erscheinen von etwas im Bezugsrahmen einer intentionalen Korrelation aber überhaupt erst ermöglichen, und sich somit als Phänomen sui generis melden – ohne sich durch die „Positivität“ eines „in ihm“ Erscheinenden ontologisch zu stabilisieren. Beispiel: Wird ein Ton in der Perspektive des ersten Phänomenbegriffs als Zeitobjekt deskriptiv analysiert, können beispielsweise „Retention“ und „Urimpression“ als präreflexive Implikationen der Konstitution eben dieses Tons aufgewiesen werden. Der zweite Phänomenbegriff verschiebt den Fokus auf die Konstitution der Zeitlichkeit der Retention selbst: Ist diese „objektiv“ oder „subjektiv, „beides“, oder „weder noch“? Wie kann ein deskriptiv-anschaulich nicht weiter Erschließbares dennoch transzendentalphänomenologisch fundiert und ausgewiesen werden? Hier verstrickt sich die deskriptive Analyse in Antinomien, welchen Schnell zufolge nur durch eine „konstruktiv“ erweiterte Methodologie beizukommen ist, mit der sich Zugang zu den ursprünglich konstituierenden Phänomenen gewinnen lässt. Denn: Es „muss mit aller Schärfe betont werden, dass das Feld des Transzendentalen sich nicht auf das in einer anschaulichen Evidenz Gegebene reduzieren lässt“ (5). Ansonsten bleibt transzendentales Philosophieren auch in seinem phänomenologischen Vollzug in einen vitiösen Zirkel gesperrt, da das Zu-Legitimierende – das im Rahmen einer intentionalen Beziehung zwischen einer „subjektiven“ und einer „objektiven“ Instanz Erscheinende – seinerseits als Legitimationsgrundlage veranschlagt wird.

Mit dieser Einsicht einer notwendigen „»Heterogenität« zwischen Bedingendem und Bedingten“ (42) hebt die generative Phänomenologie an; sie stellt sich im Grunde als Versuch dar, diese Heterogenität zwischen Weisen der Gegebenheit und der Nicht-Gegebenheit methodisch zu operationalisieren. Dementsprechend bezeichnet „Generativität“ das „Hervorkommen und Aufbrechen eines Sinnüberschusses jenseits und diesseits des phänomenologisch Beschreibbaren“ (1). Für die „Wirklichkeitsbilder“ ist dabei „diesseits“ die leitende Präposition: Als ein transzendentalphilosophisch in Anspruch nehmbares „Diesseits“ der bipolaren Dichotomien wie Subjekt/Objekt oder Bewusstsein/Welt soll sich hier die Grunddimension enthüllen, welche die „Genesis des Sinns“ (1) erzeugt und selbigen als „Spielraum“ (5) jedes intentionalen Bezogensein-Könnens konstituiert. Eine solche Genesis kann nicht als „Vermögen“ eines „präexistierenden Subjekts“ (4) angesetzt werden – zur Disposition steht nicht die Sinngebung eines Bewusstseins, sondern die Sinnbildung selbst. Folgerichtig stellt auch nicht das „Subjekt“ den „Ausgangspunkt“ des vorgelegten phänomenologischen Verfahrens dar, sondern „die so unaufhörliche wie rätselhafte Erzeugung und Bildung des »Sinns«“ (82). Zwar weist diese eine „subjektive“ Dimension auf, doch um die „Kohärenz eines »sich bildenden Sinns«“ nachzuvollziehen, bedarf es der Thematisierung einer reflexiven und pulsierenden Architektur, in der „ideale“ (auf subjektive Aktivität rückführbare) und „reale“ (aus der objektiven Äußerlichkeit hervorgehende) Elemente sich als „gleichsam organisches Netzwerk von »Fungierungen«, »Leistungen« und […] »Begriffen«“ (83) manifestieren. Auf dieser genuin transzendentalen, weil für die Sinnbildung letztkonstitutiven Stufe ist das Objekt nie „reines“ Objekt, das Subjekt nie „reines“ Subjekt – deren architektonischer Einheit, nicht deren intentionalem Gegenübersein „entspringt“ Sinn. Damit kommt ein „präimmanentes“, wechselseitiges Vermittlungsverhältnis ins Spiel, in welchem sich die intentionale Korrelation in actu ausdifferenziert: Nicht als „ein Hin-und-Her zwischen zwei bloß formal herausgebildeten Polen“ (197), sondern als „»anonyme« Genesis des »sich bildenden Sinns«“ (83). Diese ereignet sich in einer „nicht aufzuhebenden Spannung“ (206) zwischen einer „subjektiven“ und einer „objektiven“ Instanz – und damit „diesseits“ dieser Unterscheidung.

Von zentraler methodologischer Bedeutung sind nun „die jedem Sinnphänomen innewohnenden genetisch-imaginativen Prozesse“ (2). Diese gehen „konstitutiv jeglicher realen und faktischen Fixierung“ (18) voraus und ermöglichen, dass Sinn sich als der Spielraum der Weltoffenheit je schon schematisiert hat; ein Spielraum wohlgemerkt, den „jede objektivierende Wahrnehmung“, ja „jedes objektivierende Bewusstsein überhaupt“ (43), voraussetzt: „Diese »Selbst-Schematisierung« ist das eigentliche und ureigene Werk der Einbildungskraft […].“ (196) Als terminus technicus der generativen Phänomenologie bezeichnet die Einbildungskraft nicht ein subjektives Vermögen, sondern ein transzendentales „Verfahren zur Darstellung des Wirklichen“ (64), welches unablässig die Horizonte möglicher Gegenstandsbezüge des intentionalen Bewusstseins dadurch generiert, dass es „sowohl de[m] Überschuss des »Wirklichen« gegenüber dem »Bewussten« als auch de[m] Überschuss des »Erlebens« gegenüber dem »Objektivieren«“ (64) Rechnung trägt. Das Bild ist die Art und Weise, „wie diese Darstellung sich konkret vollzieht“ (64), da in ihm „Ich“ und „Nicht-Ich“ in ein „innerliches“, produktives Verhältnis gebracht und gehalten werden. Schnell bezeichnet diesen Umstand als eine durch die Einbildungskraft geleistete „Endoexogenisierung“ (26) des phänomenalen Feldes, eine Figur der Subjektivität, die an Heideggers Begriff des „ausstehenden Innestehens“ anknüpft. In ihr zeigt sich die nie zu fixierende „»Zweideutigkeit« zwischen einem »anonymen« und einem bestimmten »subjektiven« Charakter“ der Sinnbildung, eine „Doppelbewegung“ des „Schwebens“ oder „Schwingens“ „zwischen einer »endogenen« (Immanenz, Innestehen) und einer »exogenen« Dimension (Transzendenz, Ausstehen)“ (206).

Zur Untersuchung der „Regeln und Gesetzmäßigkeiten“ (89) der Genesis des Sinns entwickelt Schnell die „phänomenologische Konstruktion“ als „methodologische[n] Grundbegriff der neu zu gründenden transzendentalen Phänomenologie“ (37). Mit ihrer Hilfe soll „jegliche Faktualität in Bewegung“ versetzt werden können, „erzittern“ (6), um Zugang zu einer Konstitutionsstufe „diesseits des »Gegebenen« und des »Wahrgenommenen«“ (2) zu eröffnen. Die phänomenologische Konstruktion ist dabei eine „»generative« Verfahrensweise“ (5) – genauer: deren drei –, welche die „»bildenden« Prozesse“ zu Tage fördert, die dem „Haben“ eines „Realen“ oder eines „Gegebenen“ vor jeder faktischen „Absetzung“ zugrunde liegen. Als „Entwurf“ unternimmt eine phänomenologische Konstruktion den Versuch, die – phänomenologisch aufgefassten – transzendentalen Bedingungen des vom Phänomen Geforderten zu genetisieren. Die Ausgangspunkte phänomenologischer Konstruktionen sind die Endpunkte der deskriptiven Analyse. In einer Art (generativer) »phänomenologischer Zickzack-Bewegung«“ (38) suchen sie zwischen den „deskriptiv nicht weiter erklärbaren Phänomenen und eben dem zu Konstruierenden hin und her“ (150) zu „schwingen“. So soll das „wechselseitige Bedingungsverhältnis von Genesis und Faktualität“ (107) in eine Erfahrung transponiert werden. Diese weist eine transzendentale Struktur auf, dergestalt, dass sie sich als Ermöglichung der Möglichkeit des Ausgangspunktes realisiert. Ontologisch handelt es sich bei dem Zu-Konstruierenden weder um ein im Voraus Gegebenes, noch um eine allererst Hervorzubringendes, sondern um etwas, das einem anderen „architektonischen Register“ als dem intuitiv Individuierbaren, schon Konstituierten angehört, und der Unterscheidung zwischen Erkenntnistheorie und Ontologie vorausliegt. Mit dem Erfassen des Status dieser Methode steht und fällt das Vorhaben der „Wirklichkeitsbilder“: Ihrer Darstellung und Exemplifikation ist der in zehn Kapitel gegliederte Text im Wesentlichen gewidmet. Während die ersten drei Kapitel – „Einleitung“, „Phänomen und Konstruktion“, „Die Einbildungskraft“ – eine ideengeschichtliche Verortung sowie eine systematische Grundlegung der methodologischen Optionen leisten, „erproben“ die sechs folgenden Kapitel – „Das phänomenologische Unbewusste“, „Die Realität“, „Die Wahrheit“, „Die Zeit“, „Der Raum“ und „Der Mensch“ – das phänomenologische Konstruieren in Einzelanalysen. Hierbei werden jeweils phänomenologische Konstruktionen „vorgeführt“: Zwei nicht aufeinander reduzierbare, aber unverzichtbare epistemische Zugänge zum jeweiligen Thema werden phänomenologisch-konstruktiv um eine generative Grunddimension erweitert, die als Ermöglichung ebendieser Zugänge einsichtig wird. Das letzte Kapitel ist einer abschließenden wie ausblickenden Reflexion der Perspektiven gewidmet, die sich im Rahmen einer generativen Phänomenologie eröffnen.

Im ersten Kapitel wird dargelegt, weshalb sich die generative Phänomenologie jedem Versuch entgegenstellt – Schnell referiert als zeitgenössische Beispiele die Theorien von Claude Romano und Jocelyn Benoist –, „den Sinn in einem vorausgesetzten Realen“ (19) zu verankern. Vielmehr gilt es, die „Möglichkeit der Notwendigkeit“ (20) eines sich als real Darstellenden zu „be- und hinterfragen“ (20). Damit gerät die Aufgabe in den Blick, „die Notwendigkeit auf ihre eigene Notwendigkeit hin zu untersuchen“ (20): Die Frage ist nicht, wie sich ein sowieso notwendig Reales phänomenal bekundet, sondern wie sich die Notwendigkeit eines hypothetisch Realen phänomenalisiert. Sobald eine subjektivierte oder objektivierte „Fundierung“ der Notwendigkeit des Realen in Anspruch genommen wird – ob anschaulich beschreibbar, ob logisch oder spekulativ deduzierbar –, ist diese genuin phänomenologische Aufgabe übersprungen und der Begriff der Realität – konträr zu den Ambitionen jedes „Realismus“ – um seine Sachhaltigkeit gebracht. Um dem zu entgehen, bedarf es „jede einseitig ontologisch oder erkenntnistheoretisch ausgerichtete Verfahrensweise aufzugeben“ (22). Vielmehr erfordert das Programm der generativen Phänomenologie die Auseinandersetzung mit konkreten phänomenalen Gehalten, um „»eine transzendentale Erfahrung herauszustellen« und vor allem ein transzendentales Feld zu begründen, das diesseits jeder »anschaulichen« Erfahrung angesiedelt“ (24) und imstande ist, eine einem jeweiligen phänomenalen Gehalt angemessene „Fundierung ohne Fundament“ (22) zu leisten. Die Erschließung dieses „»anonyme[n]«, »präimmanente[n]«, »präphänomenale[n]« Feld[es]“ (26) verlangt Schnell zufolge eben jene „phänomenologischen Konstruktionen“, die er im Rahmen des generativen Ansatzes mithilfe der Feinabstimmung eines „spekulativen Transzendentalismus“ und einer „konstruktiven Phänomenologie“ zu entwickeln sucht.

Das zweite Kapitel befasst sich mit den phänomen- und erkenntnistheoretischen Grundlagen der konstruktiven Methodologie. Leitend ist dabei ein „Phänomenalitäts“-Typus, der „diesseits der reinen Gegebenheit in der immanenten Sphäre des transzendentalen Bewusstseins zu verorten ist“ (30). Als Pointe von im Detail doch sehr unterschiedlichen Ansätzen – Husserl, Heidegger, Kant – destilliert Schnell, dass es ein Phänomenalitäts-ermöglichendes Nicht-Erscheinen im Phänomen selbst gibt, von dem her sich das Phänomen überhaupt erst als Phänomen und nicht lediglich als unmittelbares Erscheinen eines objektivierten Seienden thematisieren lässt. Hier erweist sich die genuin „transzendentale Dimension des Phänomens innerhalb der Phänomenalität“: Es handelt sich dabei um jene „dynamische Dimension des Erscheinens, die sich nicht auf einen stabilen ontologischen Grund stützen kann“ (32) – nicht einmal auf eine fixe zeitliche Bestimmung –, und selbst nie als „Seinspositivität“ gegeben ist. Diese als „generativ“ ausgezeichnete Dimension in der „präimmanenten Sphäre des Bewusstseins“ (37) bietet Schnell zufolge die „Möglichkeit der Legitimierung des Sinns des Erscheindenden“ (37), ohne das transzendentale Bedingungsverhältnis qua Homogenisierung von Bedingendem und Bedingtem in einem vitiösen Zirkel zu de-plausibilisieren. Hierzu werden drei Gattungen phänomenologischer Konstruktion konzipiert. Phänomenologische Konstruktionen erster Gattung beziehen sich als „Genetisierung“ von Tatsachen auf einen präzisen Gegenstandsbereich, der auf der Ebene der immanenten Bewusstseinssphäre widersprüchliche „Fakta“ zeitigt, deren mögliche vorgängige Einheit in der präimmanenten Bewusstseinssphäre qua Konstruktion konkret ausweisbar ist. Die phänomenologische Konstruktion zweiter Gattung entspinnt sich zwischen „dem sich in der immanenten Bewusstseinssphäre darstellenden Phänomen“ (39) und dem virtuellen Horizont seiner Phänomenalisierung. Ihren Fokus bildet somit das „Aufbrechen der Genesis“ als Wechselspiel zwischen Vernichtung und bildendem Erzeugen, das als einheitliches Prinzip der Phänomenalisierung die Differenz zwischen Erscheinen und Erscheinendem konkretisiert. Eine phänomenologische Konstruktion dritter Gattung zielt auf die „ermöglichende Verdopplung“ (40) seines transzendentalen Bedingungsverhältnisses, also auf das Möglichmachen der Möglichkeit selbst. Damit realisiert sie die Einsicht, dass auf der transzendentalen Stufe der letztursprünglichen Konstitution des Sinnes des Erscheinenden die bedingende Möglichkeit sich selbst in ihrem Vermögen erscheint, das, was möglich macht, ihrerseits möglich zu machen.

Schnell exemplifiziert diese Bestimmungen im Entwurf einer generativen „Phänomenologie der Erkenntnis“. Erkenntnis als Erkenntnis ist nicht an einen bestimmten Gegenstand gebunden; zudem ist Erkenntnis nie thematisch und explizit gegeben, erscheint also nicht zusätzlich zu dem Wie des Gegebenseins eines phänomenalen Gehalts in der immanenten Bewusstseinssphäre. Damit stellt die Erkenntnis den Prototyp eines „unscheinbaren“ Phänomens dar, dessen spezifischer Phänomenalitäts-Typus sich nun qua phänomenologischer Konstruktion dritter Gattung ausweisen soll. Zuerst bilden wir uns einen „noch völlig leeren Begriff“ (43) dessen, was eine Erkenntnis als Erkenntnis auszeichnet. Unabhängig davon, wie viel inhaltliche Konkretisierung wir diesem Begriff beilegen, kommt er nicht umhin, sich als „bloße Vorstellung“ (43) zu reflektieren, nicht als tatsächliche Auszeichnung der Erkenntnis als Erkenntnis, sondern als ein „ihr gegenüberstehender Begriff davon“ (43). Um zur Auszeichnung selbst zu gelangen, muss das soeben Entworfene vernichtet werden. Es stellt sich also parallel zu jeder bloß projizierten Vorstellung ein „reflexives Verfahren“ (44) ein, das Schnell als genetischen Prozess von Erzeugung und Vernichtung bezeichnet. Anders formuliert: Im Auseinandertreten von angepeilter Auszeichnung der Erkenntnis als Erkenntnis und bloßer Vorstellung reflektiert sich die intentionale Struktur des Bewusstseins selbst. Diese Autoreflexion der Bewusstseinskorrelation ist nun genau in dem Maße präintentionales Bewusstsein, in dem sie weder ontologisch stabilisierbar noch zeitlich fixierbar ist. Damit erweist sich dieser durch die phänomenologische Konstruktion aufgedeckte „präintentionale Setzungs- und Vernichtungsakt“ (44) als konkrete Bedingung der Möglichkeit der Phänomenalisierung der Intentionalität, die eben gerade dadurch bestimmt ist, „dass das in ihr Konstituierte nicht in einem ihm Zugrundeliegenden fundiert ist“ (44). Wie ist es aber zu erklären, dass diese „zweifache entgegengesetzte vorsubjektive (und »plastische«) »Tätigkeit« eines Setzens und Aufhebens“ sich nicht einfach als „rein mechanische »Tätigkeit«“ (44) vollzieht, sondern sich bemerkt? Nur dadurch, dass sich die Reflexion der Vorstellung wiederum reflektiert, diesmal eben nicht als Reflexion der Vorstellung, sondern als Reflexion der Reflexion. Damit erschließt sich „das Reflektieren in seiner Reflexionsgesetzmäßigkeit“ (44): Es bekundet sich als Feld des „reinen Ermöglichens“ (45), das an keinem „je schon objektiv Gegebenem“ (44) haftet – weder an einem vorgestellten Gehalt auf der Ebene des immanenten Bewusstseins, noch an der Reflexion dieses Gehalts als bloßer Vorstellung. Diese Reflexion der Reflexion ist das „Urphänomen“ der Phänomenologie der Erkenntnis:  Sie drückt qua „Sich-Erfassen als Sich-Erfassen“ das „reflexible »Grundprinzip« der Ermöglichung des Verstehens von…“ (46) aus – wodurch das Erkennen als Erkennen losgelöst von jedem konkreten Inhalt und damit als Phänomen sui generis auszeichnet wäre. Vor diesem Hintergrund formuliert Schnell das „transzendentale Reflexionsgesetz“, wonach „jedes transzendentale Bedingungsverhältnis seine eigene ermöglichende Verdopplung impliziert“. Die ermöglichende Verdopplung ist eine „produktiv-erzeugende Vernichtung“ (45): Sie vernichtet jede erfahrbare Positivität eines Bedingenden, und macht so ein Bedingtes möglich. Dergestalt weist das transzendentale Reflexionsgesetz nicht lediglich die Ermöglichung dieser oder jener konkreten Möglichkeit, sondern die Ermöglichung jeder Möglichkeit als Möglichkeit – und damit das „allgemeinste Prinzip“ jeder Erkenntnisbegründung – phänomenologisch aus.

Im dritten Kapitel steht die Einbildungskraft als Grundbegriff des transzendentalen Philosophierens im Mittelpunkt. Wie lässt sich am Leitfaden der Einbildungskraft und des Bildes „die Frage nach dem Status der intentionalen Korrelation“ (59) neu aufwerfen und beantworten? Zunächst ist die Korrelation keine „äußere“, die „Subjekt“ und „Objekt“ in ein Verhältnis „partes extra partes“ stellt, sondern sie zeichnet sich durch eine „apriorische Synthetizität“ ihrer Glieder aus. In der Korrelation werden „eine Dimension der »Innerlichkeit«, die dem wahrnehmenden Subjekt eigen ist, und eine Dimension der »Transzendenz«, die dem Wahrgenommenen zugehört, unzertrennlich zusammengehalten“ (62). Das Zugleich von Abstand und Verbindung zwischen Ich und Welt realisiert sich im Bild als „Vektor der transzendentalen Leistungen der Einbildungskraft“ (63). Anders als in der Wahrnehmung und im Urteil, wo stets etwas etwas „gegenüber“ steht, unterläuft die Einbildungskraft so die gängigen, bipolaren Beschreibungen der intentionalen Struktur wie Subjekt/Objekt oder Bewusstsein/Welt. Schnell formalisiert dies als den „doppelten Entwurf des »Anderen-für-das-Selbst« und des »Selbst-im-Anderen«“ (64). Die sich hier abzeichnende „Spannung zwischen einer Immanentisierung und einer radikalen Transzendenz“ (64) ist notwendige Bedingung des phänomenalen Feldes, da es bei Zusammenbruch dieser Spannung sofort implodieren würde – diese „Endo-Exogenisierung“ (64) ist für Schnell die basale Leistung der Einbildungskraft. Wie aber leistet das Bild die „Endo-Exogenisierung“ des phänomenalen Feldes? Durch eine „phänomenalisierende“, eine „fixierende“ und eine „generative“ Dimension. Das Bild lässt etwas „erscheinen“; hierzu muss es „die unendliche Beweglichkeit des »Seienden« »diesseits« seiner Phänomenalisierung“ (65) zugunsten einer relativen Stabilität fixieren, wobei es stets Gefahr läuft, lediglich Scheinbilder oder Simulakren zu erzeugen. „Generativ“ ist das Bild nun in diesem Sinne, dass es auf einer „höheren Stufe […] die Beweglichkeit des phänomenalisierten Seienden widerspiegelt“. In dieser „Verdopplung des Bildbewusstseins“ realisiert sich nicht lediglich eine nachträglich gestiftete Einheit von Phänomenalisierung und ontologischer Stabilisierung, sondern die „»reflexible« Dimension der Einbildungskraft“ (66), die den genuin produktiven Charakter des „Bildens“ über alles „Abbilden“ hinaus ausmacht. Auf dieser „ursprünglich konstitutiven Stufe der intentionalen Korrelation“ (67) sind die Fungierungen und Leistungen der Einbildungskraft „ein Grundbestandteil der Konstitution der Realität“ (67). Hierin liegt der Sinn der Rede von der „imaginären Konstitution der Realität“: Deren Pointe ist es gerade nicht, eine diffuse Kontaminierung des Realen durch das Imaginäre zu konstatieren, sondern umgekehrt das Imaginäre als conditio sine qua non der Bestimmbarkeit des Realen als Reales einsichtig zu machen. Selbstverständlich lassen sich eine Faktualität nackter Tatsachen sowie eine irreduzible Ereignishaftigkeit der Welt „registrieren“, und dennoch: „Sobald diese Realität aber auch nur auf ihre geringste Bestimmtheit hin betrachtet wird, kommt die Einbildungskraft ins Spiel“ (68).

Kapitel vier ist der Frage nach einem „phänomenologischen Unbewussten“ gewidmet. Das Unbewusste ist als ein „bildendes Vermögen“ (78) strukturiert. Schnell unterscheidet „drei Fungierungsarten der Einbildungskraft diesseits des immanenten Bewusstseins“ (84): das genetische phänomenologische Unbewusste, das hypostatische phänomenologische Unbewusste, sowie das reflexible phänomenologische Unbewusste. Das genetische phänomenologische Unbewusste bekundet sich dort, „wo die Sphäre einer »immanenten« Gegebenheit überschritten wird“ (74). Der prekäre Status des genetischen phänomenologischen Unbewussten besteht darin, dass sich „der »positive« – im eigentlichen Sinne »genetische« – Gehalt, der hier aufgedeckt wird, auf nichts »Gegebenes« stützen kann“; stattdessen arbeitet sich die Phänomenologie an einer „gewissermaßen »negative[n]« Dimension des phänomenalen Feldes“, also am „Schwanken“ und der „Flüchtigkeit“ diesseits der Stabilität der objektiven Wirklichkeit“ – der „Genesis“ (75) – ab. Das hypostatisch phänomenologische Unbewusste bezeichnet als zweiter Typus des phänomenologischen Unbewussten dagegen den „ersten Stabilisator aller intellektuellen Tätigkeit“ (76). Es gewinnt der „grundlegenden Tendenz“ der Genesis „zur Mobilität, zur Diversität und zum Wechsel“ (75) qua Einbildungskraft eine gewisse „Unbeweglichkeit und Starre“ (76) ab. Während das genetische phänomenologische Unbewusste grundsätzlich „unendlich variabel“ ist, akzentuiert das hypostatische phänomenologische Unbewusste je „denselben Aspekt des Phänomens“ (76). Als wesentlichsten Unterschied zwischen diesen beiden Typen des phänomenologischen Unbewussten veranschlagt Schnell, „dass das hypostatisch phänomenologische Unbewusste sich grundlegend auf die Realität […] bezieht, während das genetische phänomenologische Unbewusste eher zur Aufklärung einer gewissen Erkenntnisweise der Phänomene beiträgt“ (76f.). Dem dritten Typus des phänomenologischen Unbewussten – dem reflexiblen Unbewussten – obliegt darüber hinaus die Aufgabe, das konstituierende „Vermögen des phänomenologischen Diskurses selbst“ (77) einsichtig zu machen. Das „»Gesetz« des »Sichreflektierens« der Reflexion“ (78) entfaltet die Einbildungskraft in „all ihre[r] konstitutive[n] und reflektierende[n] Kraft“ (78) und „begründet“ damit „die »imaginäre Konstitution« der Realität“ (78).  Wie verhält sich ein derart bestimmtes Unbewusstes nun zum Selbstbewusstsein? Die These der generativen Phänomenologie lautet, dass „das Selbstbewusstsein im Gegenstandsbewusstsein […] sich nicht reflexiv erklären“ lässt, sondern einen „unmittelbaren Bezug“ voraussetzt, der „eben in den Bereich des Unbewussten“ (79) fällt. Dieser kann „nicht »phänomenologisch konstruiert«“ (80) werden, und unterscheidet sich so von den drei entwickelten Typen des phänomenologischen Unbewussten. Damit positioniert sich die generative Phänomenologie auf einer Linie mit Fichte in klarer Abgrenzung zu „reflexiven Explikationsmodellen des Selbstbewusstseins“ (80). Selbstbewusstsein gründet nicht auf einem Bewusstseinsakt höherer Stufe, der sich von einem erststufigen Bewusstseinsakt numerisch unterscheidet, sondern ist als eine „»präreflexive« Dimension“ (81) in die erststufige, gegenstandsgerichtete Intention „eingebildet“. Der „unbewusste“ Charakter des Selbstbewusstseins besteht demzufolge darin, dass „der Intentionalität (zumindest teilweise) eine Nicht-Intentionalität zugrunde liegt“ (81).

Welchen Beitrag kann ein generativer Ansatz transzendentalen Philosophierens nun zu den gegenwärtigen Kontroversen leisten, die von einem neuerdings erhobenen „realistischen“ Ton in der Philosophie geprägt sind? Ebendiesen legt Kapitel fünf dar. Primäres Ziel ist es, den Standpunkt des Korrelationismus zu präzisieren – „und zwar eben durch das Prisma der Bestimmung der Realität“. Somit gilt es sowohl zu verstehen, was „jedem intentionalen Akt »Realität« zukommen lässt“, als auch „welcher Status der »Realität« dem, was über das Bewusstsein »hinausreicht«, zuzuschreiben ist“ (90). Der Beitrag der generativen Phänomenologie erweist sich als komplexe wie nuancierte Ausarbeitung einer irreduziblen Multidimensionalität des Realitäts-Begriffs. Eines einseitigen Idealismus ist sie dabei deshalb völlig unverdächtig, weil die Grundkategorien der Phänomenalisierung für ihre „realitätsstiftenden Leistungen ein wechselseitiges Bedingungsverhältnis mit dem Konstituierten“ (108) implizieren. Transzendentale Konstitution kann sich nur als ontologische Fundierung realisieren, welche – einer Art fortwährenden „Epigenese“ nicht unähnlich – die Konstitution selbst kontaminiert. Was die generative Phänomenologie deutlich von gängigen Realismen abhebt, ist die Erarbeitung zahlreicher Aspekte der Nicht-Gegebenheit, die maßgeblich zur Sachhaltigkeit und Intelligibilität des Begriffs der Realität beitragen. Denn „[d]as Reale ist nicht das Gegebene“ (90): Hierfür sprechen die Rolle der Unscheinbarkeit und der Präreflexivität in der Phänomenalisierung, die Präimmanenz als „Milieu“ der Genesis, sowie die reflexive Vernichtung des Bewusstseins in jeder stabilisierten Bestimmung – „das Bewusstsein ist das Vehikel des Gegebenseins, die Realität ist das Zugrundegehen des Bewusstseins“ (91). Den „höchsten Punkt“ der generativen Realitätsproblematik bildet die „Identifikation von Realität und »Reflexion der Reflexion«“ (108), welche die Zusammengehörigkeit des transzendentalen und des ontologischen Status des in der Sinnbildung Eröffneten stiftet. Zu erwähnen ist zudem das den Ausführungen zur „Realität“ angestellte „anankologische Argument“, welches Schnell gegen die Angriffe des „spekulativen Realismus“ auf den „Korrelationismus“ bemüht. Zu Erinnerung: Eine anzestrale Aussage bezieht sich auf einen Sachverhalt, der vor jeglicher tatsächlichen Gegebenheit von Bewusstsein gültig gewesen sein soll, wodurch die angebliche Überflüssigkeit des Korrelationismus aufgezeigt sein soll. Wie aber dem anzestral Bedeuteten die Notwendigkeit objektiver Realität zuweisen? Ohne ein in die Sinnbildung einbehaltenes Bewusstsein kann nicht darüber befunden werden, welche anzestralen Propositionen der Wahrheit entsprechen, und welche nicht – die Möglichkeit, den Sinn einer solchen Proposition zu verstehen, wäre nicht gegeben: „Während beim klassischen ontologischen Argument die Hypothese des Denkens der Wesenheit des Absoluten die Existenz des Absoluten impliziert, schließt hier […] die Existenz der Anzestralität die Notwendigkeit der möglichen Gegebenheit für und durch das sinnbildende Bewusstsein“ (112) ein. Das heißt: Durch die wohlgegründete Behauptung der Anzestralität wird die „Generativität“ des Korrelationismus bewiesen. Dieser pocht im vorliegenden Fall ja gerade nicht auf ein konstituierendes Subjekt, das einem – letztlich nicht intelligiblen – Gegenstand gegenübersteht, sondern ist als jener Sinnbildungsprozess konzipiert, in dessen Genesis sich die notwendige Sachhaltigkeit respektive die Nicht-Halluziniertheit des anzestralen Gegenstandes überhaupt erst herauskristallisieren und stabilisieren konnte.

Kapitel fünf behandelt den Begriff der Wahrheit. Die Phänomenologie fragt nicht primär nach der Wahrheit der „Korrespondenz“ qua logischem oder sinnlichem Zusammenhang zwischen einem Aussagesatz und der ihm entsprechenden Realität, sondern danach, wie sich eine Welteröffnung vollzieht, im Rahmen derer sich etwas als etwas zeigen kann, und damit überhaupt erst „Korrespondenz“-fähig wird. Zentral ist demnach das „konstitutive Verhältnis zwischen der Korrespondenz-Wahrheit und der »ursprünglichen« Wahrheit“ (129). Drei Dimensionen der Wahrheit werden hier relevant: Die „phänomenalisierende Dimension der Wahrheit“ verweist darauf, dass „jegliche[r] »Gegenstand« der Wahrheit“ (129), auf irgendeine Weise zur Darstellung gelangen muss, womit die Entdeckung einer „Sache“ auf eine „konstitutive Weise in ihr Wahrsein“ eintritt. Die „phänomenalisierende Wahrheit“ ist als eine „Manifestierung für… (Erscheinung für…, Gegebenheit für…) einen »Zeugen de jure«“ (130) notwendige, aber keine hinreichende Bedingung jeder Wahrheit. Die zweite Dimension betrifft den „Entzugscharakter der Wahrheit“: In einem transzendentalen Bedingungsverhältnis realisiert sich die Objektivierung eines Bedingten durch den Entzug seines Bedingenden – ein Entzug, der als „negativer Bezug“ in „jede Manifestierung, Erscheinung oder Gegebenheit hineinspielt“ (131). Der Entzug kann sich nun aber als Selbstreflexion dieses „wechselseitigen Bedingungsverhältnisses“ genetisieren, dergestalt, dass er sich als „stetige[r] Wechsel zwischen einer »Präsenz« und einer »Nicht-Präsenz«“ (132) realisiert. Eine solche „Erfahrung“ des Transzendentalen impliziert, „dass das Bedingte auf das Bedingende zurückwirkt“ (131), was eben die Wahrheit „der Erscheinung bzw. der Gegebenheit selbst ausmacht“ (132). Der dritten, der „generativen Dimension der Wahrheit“, obliegt eine doppelte Aufgabe: Sie bestimmt den Entzugscharakter der Wahrheit auf positive Weise und macht verständlich, was genau die Wahrheitsdimension des konstruktiven Vorgehens kennzeichnet. Beides leistet sie als Reflexion der Reflexion: „Die Wahrheit ist die Reflexion der Reflexion […].“ (132) In einem ersten Schritt stellt sie einen Abstand her, in dem sich der Entzugscharakter spiegelt; in einem zweiten Schritt erweist sich die Wahrheit als „produktive Reflexivität“, als eine „erzeugende, schöpferische, d.h. generative Dimension“. Die Wahrheit ist die Dimension, in der sich das Transzendentale als reines Vermögen der Realisierung selbst realisiert: Ein Gegenstand wird reflexiv gesetzt, wodurch dessen Reflexionsgesetz allererst bedingt wird. Nur so entsteht überhaupt ein „Probierstein der Realität“ (133), dergestalt, dass ein Gegenstand nach Maßgabe der präimmanenten Binnendifferenzierung, in welcher sich die Ermöglichung seines So-Seins herausbildet, thematisierbar wird. Denn ein Gegenstand, der eine Aussage wahr macht, ist nicht selbst die Wahrheit; die Wahrheit ist die reflexive Bezugsdimension, eine Art intelligibler Holon, in welchem der Gegenstand als Einheit der Differenz von Reflexion der Reflexion und Realität appräsentierbar ist. Die logische Gestalt, in welcher sich dies zusammen denken lässt, ist die „kategorische Hypothetizität“ (134): Sie bezeichnet den Umschlag einer Möglichkeit in eine Notwendigkeit im Vollzug der Genetisierung einer nicht weiter deskriptiv analysierbaren Gegebenheit qua phänomenologischer Konstruktion – und damit einen Vorschlag zur Lösung der Frage, wie das Notwendige möglich ist. Dass ein solcher „Sprung im Register“ sich in actu realisiert und nicht „untergeschoben“ wird, befreit den generativen Wahrheitsbegriff aus den vitiösen Zirkeln, welche transzendentales und hermeneutisches Philosophieren bis heute prägen.

Das sechste Kapitel unternimmt eine Abhandlung des Problems der Zeit. Wenn die Zeit weder eine subjektive noch eine objektive „Form“, wenn ihre „Vorausgesetztheit“ nicht empirisch-real noch rein logisch ist, sie sowohl in ihrer transzendentalen „Idealität“ wie auch in ihrer empirischen „Realität“ zu denken ist: Wie kann die von Husserl eingeführte, genuin zeitkonstituierende Intentionalität bestimmt werden? „Aktiv-signitiver“ Art kann sie nicht sein, da es sich „um keinerlei bedeutungsstiftende Intentionalität“ (146) handelt; „passiv-intuitiver“ Art kann sie aber auch nicht sein – zwar ist sie sicherlich passiv in dem Sinne, dass sie nicht eigens hervorzubringen ist, aber Anschaulichkeit reicht nicht hin, um ihre präintentionale Konstitution verständlich zu machen. Es gilt also, qua phänomenologischer Konstruktion eine Form der Selbstgegebenheit aufzuzeigen, die weder „auf ein rein passives Vorliegen, noch auf eine Einbettung der Spontaneität in eine [bereits objektiv konstituierte, F.E.] zeitlich-sinnliche Dimension verweist“ (150). Hierzu unterscheidet Schnell zuerst zwei Arten der immanenten Zeitlichkeit, „erlebte Zeit“ und „gestiftete Zeit“: Die erlebte Zeit umfasst das volle Spektrum der Möglichkeiten von Erscheinungsweisen der Zeit – jedes Seiende hat seine ihm „ureigene Zeit“ (148). Spezifisch für die erlebte Zeit ist ihre enge Verflochtenheit mit der Erfahrung eines „Ich“: Sie erzeugt stets nicht-anonyme „Weisen der Horizonteröffnung, die zuallererst für uns selbst die Welt offenbar zu machen gestatten“. Des Weiteren zeichnet sie sich durch „radikale Reflexionslosigkeit“ (148) aus. Die gestiftete Zeit hingegen zielt auf Einheitlichkeit, auf einen Maßstab, der zur „Zeitmessung“ dienen kann. Dabei kommt es zu einem „Gegensatz zwischen der Vielfalt der Zeiten […] und der Einheit der gestifteten Zeit“ (149), sowie zu einer Aporie der Reflexion: Innerhalb der gestifteten Zeit wird ein absoluter Zeitrahmen vorausgesetzt, der „präempirisch und präreflexiv“ ist; die Einheitlichkeit ist aber ein Produkt der Reflexion. Die Reflexion ist demnach nicht das geeignete Mittel, „um die Konstitution der Zeit und des Zeitbewusstseins verständlich zu machen und zu rechtfertigen“ (149). Wie ist es also möglich, dem „Zeitcharakter der erlebten Zeit einerseits und der gestifteten Zeit andererseits phänomenologisch-konstruktiv […] auf die Spur zu kommen“ (150)?  Dargelegt werden muss, wie die Vermittlung von „Protentionalität“ und „Retentionalität“ zu plausibilisieren ist, ohne das Schema Auffassung/Auffassungsinhalt auf eine „rein hyletische Urimpression“ anzuwenden. Hier kommt eine dritte Art der Zeitlichkeit zum Tragen, die „präimmanente Zeit“. Diese stellt sich dar als ein die immanenten Zeitlichkeiten konstituierendes Phasenkontinuum, der „Urprozess“. Jede Phase dieses Kontinuums ist ein „»retentionales« und »protentionales« Ganzes“ (151), und besteht aus einem „Kern“ – auch als „Urphase“ bezeichnet – maximaler Erfüllung, sowie aus modifizierten Kernen, deren Erfüllung proportional zur Entfernung von der Urphase nach Null hin tendiert. Dergestalt eröffnet sich ein Feld von „Kernen“, die „im Ablauf ihrer Erfüllungen und Entleerungen eben die präimmanente Zeitlichkeit ausmachen“ (152), und als „Substrate“ der Noesis die Intentionalität strukturell konstituieren. Das „Selbsterscheinen“ (153) dieses Urprozesses am Schnittpunkt der jeweils diskreten „Kerne“ ermöglicht ineins die ursprüngliche Gegenwart des präreflexiven Selbstbewusstseins wie auch jede gestiftete und erlebte Zeit.

Die räumlichen Aspekte der generativen Phänomenologie sind Gegenstand des siebten Kapitels. Ziel ist es, die Konstitution der Räumlichkeit und des Räumlichkeitsbewusstseins zu erhellen. Grundlegende Beiträge liefern Husserl mit der Darstellung der Relevanz von „Leiblichkeit“ und „Einbildungskraft“ bei der Konstitution des Raumes, sowie Heidegger durch die Vorarbeiten zum Begriff einer Endo-Exogenisierung des phänomenologischen Feldes. Maßgeblich für den Ansatz der „Wirklichkeitsbilder“ sind jedoch die Analysen, die Marc Richir hinsichtlich der räumlichen Aspekte der Sinnbildung vorgelegt hat. Leitend sind dabei zwei Fragestellungen: Was ist die leibliche Dimension der Sinnbildung? Was sichert und ermöglicht den Bezug auf eine Äußerlichkeit, die es vermeidet, diese Sinnbildung durch ihre Immanentisierung in eine Tautologie verfallen zu lassen? An diese Perspektive anschließend sucht Schnell „Räumlichkeit“ als eine „grundlegende Dimension des Sinnbildungsprozesses“ (171) in den Blick zu bekommen. Hierzu wird eine dreifache Differenz angesetzt: Die räumliche Bestimmtheit der „scheinbaren Exogenität“ in natürlicher Einstellung – also die Erfahrung einer „Äußerlichkeit“, die als „präexistent“ oder „prästabilisiert“ angesehen wird –, verwischt die Notwendigkeit, diesseits der Unterscheidung von „Innen“ und „Außen“ ein diese Unterscheidung erst ermöglichendes „Vermittlungsverhältnis von Endogenität und Exogenität des phänomenologischen Feldes“ (172) zu konzipieren. Die „räumliche Dimension der Hypostase“ thematisiert den Umstand, dass trotz der Zusammengehörigkeit von Räumlichkeit und Zeitlichkeit als „Raumzeitlichkeit“ – der „Grundform der Phänomenalisierung“ (173) –, spezifische Unterschiede zwischen räumlichen und zeitlichen Bestimmungen bestehen. Während die Zeit grundlegend durch ein Fließen charakterisiert ist, erscheint der Raum hingegen „fix, stabil, unwandelbar“. „Hypostase“ als „transzendentaler Ausdruck“ dieser Stabilität ist qua phänomenologischer Konstruktion zweiter Gattung als produktive Vernichtung der Bewegung zu fassen, dahingehend, „dass hierdurch sowohl die räumliche Dimension des Verstehens als auch das, worin das Verstehen sich entfaltet, gedacht zu werden vermag“ (174). Als dritte räumliche Bestimmtheit werden die „räumlichen Implikationen der transzendierenden Reflexibilität“ entfaltet. Während die „transzendentale Reflexibilität“ als die Eigenschaft der Sinnbildung ausgemacht wurde, welche die „innerlichen Notwendigkeiten“ des phänomenalen Feldes aufdeckt, kommt es hier darauf an, die „transzendierende Reflexibilität“ als die Eigenschaft der Sinnbildung zu begreifen, welche die „äußerlichen Notwendigkeiten“ des phänomenalen Feldes zu erschließen gestattet. Ausschlaggebend ist dabei, dass diese nicht lediglich auf etwas Vorgängiges reflektiert, sondern „das Sich-erscheinen des (Sich-)reflektierens erfasst wird“. Ermöglicht ist dies durch eine „Identifikation zwischen dem Abstand von Alterität und Äußerlichkeit“ (175), sowie ein dem Sinnbildungs-Schematismus innewohnender Abstand zu sich selbst; beide Aspekte fungieren als basaler Bezugsrahmen jeder weiteren räumlichen Bestimmbarkeit.

Das achte Kapitel wendet sich der Konzeption einer neuen phänomenologischen Anthropologie zu, in deren Zentrum der Begriff des „homo imaginans“ steht. Bei der generativen Konturierung des Humanum steht nicht das Verhältnis von Anthropologie und Phänomenologie im Mittelpunkt, sondern diejenigen Bestimmungen, welches es ermöglichen, den „Status des Menschen diesseits der Unterscheidung von Erkenntnistheorie und Ontologie“ (187) offen zu legen. Jeder Bestimmung gehen genetisch-imaginative Prozesse voraus, welche die Intelligibilität einer möglichen Bestimmung erst gewährleisten. Um einer „vorausgesetzten Welt“ anzugehören, muss der Mensch immer schon dreifach „bildend“ tätig gewesen sein: qua Vorstellung, qua Reflexion, und qua Einbildung. Die „Vorstellung“ ist das Phänomen, „durch das wir uns ursprünglich auf die Welt beziehen“ (188). Sie lässt erscheinen, nach Maßgabe implizierter Verständnisse von „Welt“ und „Selbst“. In der „Reflexion“ wird das Bild als Bild thematisch, gerät in einen Abstand zu sich: Die Welt geht in ihrem Bild nicht auf. In der Vernichtung der „Kompaktheit und Geschlossenheit“ (191) des ersten Bildes wird das ihm implizite „Selbst“ als entwerfendes explizit; die im ersten Bild prätendierte Stabilität der Welt wird in eine irreduzible Abständigkeit von Bild und Welt transponiert, die selbstverständliche Unmittelbarkeit des Bildes wandelt sich in das reflexive Bewusstsein, durch ein Selbst geleistet worden zu sein – an die Stelle eines Bildes der Welt tritt ein Bild des Selbst. Der spezifisch menschliche – nicht mechanische! – Charakter der Reflexion wird aber erst mit der „Einbildung“ erfasst: Jedes Bewusstsein von etwas ist nicht nur „vorstellendes“ und „reflexives“ Bewusstsein, sondern auch „reflexibles“ Bewusstsein. Das, was es möglich macht, verdoppelt sich in „das, was das Möglich-Machen selbst möglich macht“ (192) – die „bedingende“ Möglichkeit erscheint selbst in ihrem Vermögen, das, was möglich macht, ihrerseits möglich zu machen. Anders formuliert: Das Sein-Können der Bild-Bildung erscheint in den zu diesem Können notwendigen Bedingungen. In der Reflexion auf die Reflexion der Vorstellung realisiert sich die transzendentale Struktur des Bewusstseins als die Ermöglichung ihrer selbst – diese „ist“ nur, insofern sie sich „bildet“. Nachdem die generative Verfahrensweise ihre Rechtmäßigkeit durch die Wohlgegründetheit – ohne „negativen“ Zirkel – ihrer Möglichkeit erwiesen hat, kommt als ihr Korrelat nur das Reale selbst in Frage. Die ontologischen Implikationen dieses Realen sind eben jene Bedingungen, die zur Realisierung des „ermöglichenden Vermögens“ (193) zu veranschlagen sind. Der Mensch ist „homo imaginans“ bedeutet dann: Jedes Bewusstsein, das sich als Einheit der Differenz von Selbstentwurf, Reflexivität und Reflexibilität selbst erscheint, ist humanes Bewusstsein.

Das letzte Kapitel dient einer Synopse der Grundlegung eines spekulativen Transzendentalismus in der Gestalt einer generativen Phänomenologie. Schnell hebt als Leitmotiv die „Endoexogenisierung des phänomenalen Feldes“ als neue, „auf die Transzendenz hinausweisende“ Dimension der Subjektivität hervor, die „den konstitutiven Vorrang der Einbildungskraft“ (195) als „Matrize der Subjektivität“ (198) sichtbar werden lässt. Die Pointe ist dabei, dass „die Transzendenz nicht bloß das »formale Andere« des konstitutiven Vermögens“ der Subjektivität ist, sondern diese „gleichsam selbst konstituiert“ (198). Vier Spielarten der Transzendenz bilden dabei den Möglichkeitsraum der Phänomenalisierung des Subjekts im Prozess der Sinnbildung: „Prinzip oder absolutes Ich“, „Welt“, „Radikale Alterität“, „Absolute Transzendenz“. Durch die Aufweisung eines „phänomenalisierenden“ Moments, eines „plastischen-vernichtenden und zugleich hypostatischen“ – und dank dieses Zusammenwirkens „reflexiven“ – Moments, sowie eines „reflexiblen“ Moments bekundet sich die Einbildungskraft als „ursprünglich bildendes Vermögen“ in phänomenologischen Konstruktionen, wobei keine epistemische oder ontologische Priorität eines dieser Momente festzustellen ist. Die qua phänomenologischer Konstruktion anvisierten „transzendentalen Erfahrungen“ konkretisieren sich in Auseinandersetzung mit jeweiligen „phänomenalen Gehalten“. Sie „gelingen“ als „Fundierung ohne Fundament“ (209), wenn die Genesis der Faktualität vollzogen werden kann, und die „Möglichkeit der Notwendigkeit“ am Zu-Genetisierenden verständlich wird.

Liest man die „Wirklichkeitsbilder“ im Kontext seiner bisherigen – mehrheitlich französischsprachigen – Forschungen, wird einsichtig, auf welchem Reflexionsniveau Schnell den transzendentalen Problemhorizont entwickelt. Verglichen mit dem Stand aktueller Literatur zum Thema ist der hier zum Einsatz kommende Begriff des Transzendentalen in seiner systematischen Prägnanz und historischen Tiefe beispiellos: Die von Kant angestrebte Erkenntnislegitimation wird unternommen, der spekulativ-imaginative Ansatz Fichtes in die Auseinandersetzung mit konkreten phänomenalen Gehalten gebracht, der von Schelling beschriebene Prozess der Selbst-Objektivierung der Natur in seinen architektonischen Implikationen als wechselseitiges Bedingungsverhältnis entfaltet, Husserls Überforderung der Anschauung in transzendentaler Perspektive mithilfe neu entwickelter Kriterien phänomenologischer Ausweisbarkeit zur Disposition gestellt, und schließlich Heideggers Figur der „Ermöglichung“ ausgestaltet. Die transzendentalphilosophische Gretchen-Frage, wie das Apriori selbst begründet werden kann, ist pointiert entwickelt und aufschlussreich beantwortet; die generative Plausibilisierung der Möglichkeit, wie durch apriorische Denkformen das Seiende in seiner Realität erfasst werden kann, ist erstrangig unter den bisherigen Versuchen der phänomenologisch-transzendentalen Tradition. Gerade für Skeptiker eines transzendentalen Philosophie-Stils wird es überraschend ein, dass der Begriff der Realität letztlich nur „gewinnt“: Keine einzige empirisch-inhaltliche Bestimmung des Realen wird in ihrer Gültigkeit desavouiert, sondern lediglich in einen Bezugsrahmen transponiert, der die Möglichkeit ihrer Wohlgegründetheit verständlich macht. Der vor allem gegen Fichte oft vorgebrachte Einwand, weshalb der Realismus erst auf einer „Meta-Stufe“ einsetzen sollte, verliert durch die Herausstellung der Einheit des transzendentalen und ontologischen Status des in der präimmanenten Sphäre Eröffneten an Wucht. Diese Einheit ist dabei keine De-Realisierung „objektiver“ Sachhaltigkeit, sondern eröffnet die Möglichkeit, eine Zusammengehörigkeit von Realitätsbestimmung und Erkenntnislegitimation so zu denken, dass einsehbar wird, wie Aussagen überhaupt Gegenstände „treffen“ können. So verwandelt sich der „Korrelationismus“ am Leitfaden seiner „Endo-Exogenisierung“ in eine philosophische Position mit einer Leistungsfähigkeit, sowohl der „Immanenz“ als auch der „Transzendenz“ Rechnung zu tragen, die ihm in diesem Ausmaß wohl selbst von seinen Verfechtern kaum mehr zugetraut wurde. Es bleibt abzuwarten, ob sich Realismen, die eine robuste Schlichtheit und Selbstverständlichkeit des Sich-Beziehen-Könnens auf Reales als besonders „realistisch“ inszenieren, sich der in der generativen Phänomenologie erschlossenen Komplexität des Zustandekommens eines nicht-trivialen, sachhaltig bestimmbaren Realitäts-Begriffs stellen. Geschieht dies nicht, befänden wir uns in einer für jeden „Realismus“ wenig schmeichelhaften ideengeschichtlichen Lage, in der ein phänomenologisch fundierter, aber nichtsdestotrotz spekulativer Transzendentalismus zum begrifflichen Kern seiner ureigenen Ambition wesentlich mehr beizutragen hätte als er selbst.

Auch das phänomenologische Pensum der „Wirklichkeitsbilder“ ist beachtlich. Schnell beherrscht die klassische Phänomenologie (Husserl, Heidegger, Fink) ebenso differenziert wie die französische Phänomenologie (vor allem Levinas und Richir). Besonders hervorzuheben ist dabei sein elaborierter Umgang mit zentralen Aspekten des Werks des hierzulande noch kaum erschlossenen belgischen Phänomenologen Marc Richir, dem der so zentrale Begriff eines Sich-bildenden-Sinns (sens se faisant) entlehnt ist. Und unabhängig davon, ob die konkrete methodische Verfahrensweise der phänomenologischen Konstruktion anerkannt und praktiziert wird, ist die Trias der Tatsachen, welche die generative Phänomenologie ausweist, unter allen Umständen ein bleibender Ertrag: An der Unterscheidung zwischen „Urtatsachen“ als Thema phänomenologischer Metaphysik, „Gegebenheits-Tatsachen“ plus präreflexiver Implikationen als Thema deskriptiver Phänomenologie und „präintentionalen Tatsachen“ als Thema konstruktiver Phänomenologie dürfte für jede zukünftige Phänomenologie kein Weg vorbei führen. Besonders verdient macht sich die generative Phänomenologie zudem um den Begriff der Intentionalität: Dieser droht zu Beginn des 21. Jahrhunderts zunehmend zu einem metaphysischen Ausgangspunkt der philosophischen Theorie-Bildung zu gerinnen, dessen weiterer Erklärung es nicht mehr bedarf. Ein avancierter Bild-Begriff scheint dabei eine viel versprechende Herangehensweise, das Projekt einer „systematischen Enthüllung der konstituierenden Intentionalität selbst“ (Hua I, 164) als unabdingbare Aufgabe des Phänomenologisierens weiterhin ernst zu nehmen. In den „Wirklichkeitsbildern“ zeichnet sich ab, dass er durchaus über das nötige Potenzial verfügt, das oft übergangene, aber grundlegende Problem der Motivation und Begründetheit der „Leerintentionalität“ als pronominalem Bezug auf ein ens intentum tantum – ein „Alles“ ohne definierte Grenze – neu und äußerst erhellend aufzuwerfen. Hier könnte die generative Phänomenologie wichtige Fragen klären, die auch in der Sinnfeldontologie von Markus Gabriel aufkommen – Fragen, die allesamt um das Sein des Sinns kreisen –, dort aber bisher einer überzeugenden Lösung harren.

Wie es seitens des Phänomenologinnen allerdings aufgenommen werden wird, dass Schnell nicht das Transzendentale zugunsten des „Prinzips aller Prinzipien“ kippt, sondern umgekehrt dem „Prinzip aller Prinzipien“ zugunsten des Transzendentalen als methodologischer Grundlage eine dezidierte Absage erteilt, bleibt abzuwarten. Hier bedarf es wahrscheinlich noch weiterer Klärungs- und Darstellungsarbeit, um die spezifische Intuitivität der phänomenologischen Konstruktionen auch für SkeptikerInnen der Möglichkeit einer Imaginations-basierten „Fundierung ohne Fundament“ zu erschließen. Denn auch die „Wirklichkeitsbilder“ sind kraft ihres methodischen Anspruchs von dem mitunter quasi-weltanschaulich geführten Disput betroffen, ob es eine genuine phänomenologische Methodologie überhaupt gibt. Jedoch ist das Reflexionsniveau und das Rezeptionsspektrum der generativen Phänomenologie wesentlich höher zu veranschlagen als das von populären Bestreitungen der Möglichkeit phänomenologischer Methodologie, wie sie beispielsweise Tom Sparrow mit „The End of Phenomenology“ vorgelegt hat. In diesem Text werden weder die systematischen Verbindungslinien zwischen Phänomenologie und Transzendentalphilosophie noch die neuesten Entwicklungen der phänomenologischen Theorie-Bildung berücksichtigt, was die Ergebnisse entweder zur Glaubensfrage oder obsolet macht – eine Alternative, die doch gerade der Phänomenologie vorgeworfen wird. Die Herausforderung bleibt dennoch bestehen: Jede Phänomenologie, so binnendifferenziert sie auch sein mag, muss sich zusätzlich an der Möglichkeit messen lassen, ob sie über den Kreis derer, die sich schon für sie als Philosophie-Stil der Wahl entschieden haben, auf eine Weise rezipierbar ist, die ihr ein nachhaltiges Sich-Einschreiben in einen globalen Austausch des Philosophierens erlaubt. Dies kann und muss sie einerseits durch die Sachhaltigkeit ihrer Darstellungen, aber auch durch die Ernstnahme der zeitgenössischen hermeneutischen Situation leisten, die nach wie vor durch naturalistische und wieder durch metaphysische Grund-Orientierungen geprägt ist. Für einen Text mit methodologischem Anspruch wie die „Wirklichkeitsbilder“ könnte dies beispielsweise bedeuten, den Begriff der phänomenologischen Konstruktion und den Begriff der Abduktion als methodische Optionen mit jeweiligen epistemologischen und ontologischen Implikationen explizit zueinander in Beziehung zu setzen, um Ausgangspunkte für Diskussionen zu erzeugen, die Stil-unabhängig geführt werden können.

Abschließend bleibt zu erwähnen, dass sich der vorliegende Ansatz als äußerst wertvoll zur Re-Vitalisierung einer phänomenologischen Psychopathologie erweisen könnten. Einiges deutet darauf hin, dass die sich dort artikulierenden Blockierungen des Selbst- und Welt-Vollzugs stärker als bisher herausgestellt imaginativer Natur sind. In vielen pathologisch relevanten Fällen ist eine „Monotonie des Bildbildungsschemas“ (Blankenburg) auffällig, die bisher nicht systematisch als spezifische Modifikationen der Einbildungskraft identifizierbar werden, welche in einer ko-generativen Beziehung zum leichter ausweisbaren, veränderten Reflexions- und Affekt-Erleben stehen. Hier drängt sich die Frage auf, ob nicht „diesseits“ aller gängigen Unterscheidungen – Verstand / Gefühl / Leib / Gemeinschaft / Welt – bisher nicht explizit thematisierbare Weisen der Wieder-Intensivierung der imaginativen Ressourcen in den Blick kommen könnten. Dies wäre jedenfalls ab dem Moment möglich und sinnvoll, in dem die imaginäre Konstitution der Wirklichkeit auf grundbegrifflicher Ebene hinreichend plausibilisiert und ausgearbeitet wäre – hierzu sind die „Wirklichkeitsbilder“ ein gewaltiger und verdienstvoller Schritt.

Edward Baring: Converts to the Real: Catholicism and the Making of Continental Philosophy, Harvard University Press, 2019

Converts to the Real: Catholicism and the Making of Continental Philosophy Couverture du livre Converts to the Real: Catholicism and the Making of Continental Philosophy
Edward Baring
Harvard University Press
2019
Hardback $49.95 • £35.95 • €45.00
504

Natalie Depraz, Agnès Celle (Eds.): Surprise at the Intersection of Phenomenology and Linguistics, John Benjamins, 2019

Surprise at the Intersection of Phenomenology and Linguistics Couverture du livre Surprise at the Intersection of Phenomenology and Linguistics
Natalie Depraz, Agnès Celle (Eds.)
John Benjamins
2019
Hardback EUR 95.00 | USD 143.00
vi, 180 pp.+ index

Matthias Fritsch: Taking Turns with the Earth: Phenomenology, Deconstruction, and Intergenerational Justice

Taking Turns with the Earth: Phenomenology, Deconstruction, and Intergenerational Justice Couverture du livre Taking Turns with the Earth: Phenomenology, Deconstruction, and Intergenerational Justice
Matthias Fritsch
Stanford University Press
2018
Paperback $27.95
280

Reviewed by: Christopher Black (Texas A&M University)

Introduction

Taking Turns With the Earth offers to the reader a rich and incisive analysis of intergenerational justice, especially as it relates to issues pertaining to the environment.  With intergenerational ethics being relevant to so many issues that we face today, this book offers a timely theoretical analysis of the nature of our obligations to non-contemporary others.

This book makes clear that the theoretical nature of obligations to future generations is fraught and contested terrain, and Fritsch spends a sizable amount of time early in the text outlining the major ontological problems and methods in intergenerational justice (IGJ), of which there are multitudes. At times, especially in the early expository sections, so much theoretical matter is covered in such close succession that it becomes theoretically dense.  The multifarious forms of epistemic problems, interaction problems, world-constitution issues, and nonexistence challenges, and the various responses to each problem almost blur together into one mass.  But if taken slowly and deliberately, this expository portion is tremendously helpful towards understanding the state of the IGJ literature.  Within this section, too, certain portions – such as the discussion of the nonidentity problem (34) and the challenges it raises to common moral concepts such as autonomy and personhood – raise especially powerful challenges to IGJ in general, but also ones that Fritsch ably responds to.  Only after this expository portion do we get to Fritsch’s original contributions to the topic, which include his major claim and two models of intergenerational justice that follow from it.

He responds to the epistemic and ontological problems associated with intergenerational justice by promoting a social ontology that is attuned to what he calls the “ineluctability” of normativity, and which deals directly with “the relations among subjectivity, time, and generations.” Fritsch identifies a basis of normativity which he thinks need be recognized for an ontological account of IGJ to be adequately normatively sensitive. Specifically, he claims that both natality and mortality, or the fact that we are always already living in the time of birth and death, should be considered constitutive of moral subjectivity.  Moral subjectivity is a term which he thinks contains both moral status (being a legitimate object of moral concern) and moral agency (the capacity to freely choose a course of action). This moral subjectivity-constituting view of birth and death – which he expands upon further in chapter two – foregrounds the two models of IGJ which he introduces in chapters three and four, respectively. The first model of IGJ that Fritsch proposes is indirect reciprocity, which he elaborates further into his idea of asymmetrical reciprocity.  This model is meant to capture the role that indebtedness to previous others plays in giving to future others. The model is exemplified as follows: “A gives to B who ‘returns’ the gift to C (so for example, from past to future via the present.” (11) The second model of IGJ – which is outlined in chapter 4 – is the idea of “taking turns.” Fritsch argues this model is more appropriate for holistic or quasi-holistic objects (such as the earth or nature) because such holistic objects cannot be divided up and distributed like a cake. Whereas reciprocity depends upon substitutability, taking turns does not depends upon this principle.  Thus, the latter model is better equipped to deal with holistic, intergenerational, indivisible “objects” in a way that the former is not.

Summary

Now that I have quickly outlined the general structure of book I will undertake a more detailed summary, with an eye towards identifying the way of thinking about IGJ (i.e. the presentist view) that Taking Turns With the Earth resists, and then I will summarize the alternatives models to the presentist view that Fritsch offers in this book. Following that I will offer a few comments about the strengths and weakness of this book.

 The book starts out quickly with a series of salvos directed towards a certain set of people whom Fritsch refers to as “presentists.”  Presentists are those who exist as if they gave “birth to themselves.” Such people believe themselves to be self-standing individuals that are ontologically unrelated to past or future generations. Consequently, and critically, Fritsch (with continual reference to Stephen Gardiner) claims that because of this ontological short-sightedness presentists are subject to a form of “moral corruption.” Such corruption, it seems, is derived from a lack of social-ontological self-awareness, and results in a lack of care or adequate moral concern for noncontempories (both past and future, but especially future). Presentists’ lack of moral concern for noncontempories reveals itself most clearly on issues relating to the climate and non-renewable energy use. It is certainly true that conversations about these topics often reveal that there are many people who simply do not care about the welfare of individuals who will live, say, three or more generations down the line.  (This is the concept of “non-overlapping future people” illustrated on page 21.) The general nature of Fritsch’s indictment of presentism is compelling, and his concerns about intergeneration ethics are well warranted, but I think that it would be helpful if his idea of moral corruption (3) were given more explication, especially as many who participate in “presentist” practices (heavy dependence on fossil fuels by driving daily, for example) probably do so unreflectively or out of sense of perceived necessity.  Fritsch’ concept of moral corruption seems to imply a moral quality more active and malicious than this, though.  Instead, however, the indictment of moral corruption is given as just so.

Fritsch then argues that recently certain issues that are intergenerationally relevant, such as climate change, have come nearer to the center of public consciousness, and in doing so have made the topic of intergenerational justice more approachable. Notwithstanding these shifts in public approachability, he argues that there is still a prevailing – or at least a significant –  mythology of the temporally and historically isolated individual alive today, and he sets it as his task to debunk the myth of this kind of individualism in this book. In the introductory section he seems to come very close to claiming that those who hold to ideals such as individuality or autonomy, or perhaps even those who even believe that individuals exist at all, do not have the capacity to have care-filled relationship with contemporary or noncontemporary others. Surely it is the case that our identities are significantly extended through past and future, but it also seems that individuals are the kinds of being – and perhaps the only kinds of beings – that are capable of the capacity to care, be they a dog, a frog, or a friend. Crowds can’t care, only the individuals in them, at least if we are talking about the kind of care that can turn into moral corruption, not the kind of synergetic “care” that a superorganism (i.e. an ant colony or a coral reef) might be said to have for itself. But, to be clear, it seems that the idea of individuality that he is resisting is an idea of something like the liberal or the neo-liberal self, not an idea of selfhood like Heidegger’s authentic Dasein or Levinas’ other-constituted moral subject, and in the overarching scheme of this book this interpretation seems more sensible.  Indeed, later in the book Fritsch uses Heidegger’s “being-towards-death” as a stepping-stone (45/46) to get towards Levinas’ modified, intergenerationalized interpretation of self: being-for-beyond-my death (l’être-pour-au-delà-da-ma-mort). (67)  Upholding an intergenerational idea of self is critical to moving beyond a presentistic idea of self and, if Fritsch is right about presentism leading to moral corruption, then eschewing a presentistic idea of selfhood should lead us towards a better ontological alternative.  As the title of Chapter 1.4 states: “Ontological Problems Call for Ontological Approaches.”

To make the ontological adjustments that Fritsch argues that we need, the argument of the book turns towards an engagement with Levinas.  Fritsch specifically engages with the intersections of time, normativity, and sociality that can be found in Levinas’ thought.  Levinas offers a way of thinking about death, temporality, sociality, and normativity in a way that is helpful to Fritsch’ project of re-orienting IGJ. Fritsch seems to rely most heavily on Levinas’ thinking about temporality, and for good reason, because – as will soon be shown – this section adds strength to this book’s argument. Fritsch demonstrates that for Levinas death is not an isolating, individualizing event – as the existentialist pathos of Heidegger would have us believe – but that it is instead an inherently interpersonal, historical event.  Levinas agrees with Heidegger that meaning and agency depend of death, but contra Heidegger Levinas maintains that one’s own death is always inaccessible, and that it is only known in and through the experience of others.  For Levinas death is ever futural and never calculable; because of this, it is possible to psychically murder someone, but it is impossible to morally annihilate someone. (76)  Moral traces, vestiges, and memories of the moral other remain in a meaningful order beyond their physical death – even if the body is dead, there is no total annihilation of the other.

Levinas’ argument that a meaningful order exists beyond one’s death and his claim that death is a fundamentally interpersonal event, paired with Levinas’ assessment that our being is always already existing between the “immemorial past” and the infinite future, leads Fritsch towards his development of a model of ethical responsibility based upon Levinas’ idea of fecundity (fecondité).  Taking adequate precautions (86-91), Fritsch uses fecundity to argue that fecundity makes manifest the claim that relations with future people are not an afterthought but, instead, should be thought of as the exemplification of ethics in general. (88) It is the natal-mortal exposure to one’s child that both opens one up to a meaningful sense of time beyond one’s own life-span, but which also simultaneously hearkens back to the past, to previous generations – to those that gave birth to the parents, and the parents’ parents, and so on. At this nexus – in the fecund sense of time between birth and death – moral subjectivity emerges.  This fecund nexus demonstrates to us phenomenologically the kind of temporal being that we are, and also simultaneously infuses both the past and the future with ineluctable moral significance.

At this point, after having argued that we are the kinds of beings that exist as being-for-beyond-my-death and also always in relation to the past, Fritsch begins to turn the argument towards his reciprocity based model of IGJ, which is the first of the two models he proposes in this book.  Section 2.5 (“Intergenerational Reciprocities,” 91) introduces the language of reciprocity by stating: “If subjectivity can give birth to a fecund future only by owing to previous others, then its moral-ontological historicity can be captured by a Janus-faced form of reciprocity that refers both backward and forward.” Despite the wordiness of this passage – a regular trait in this book – the introduction of this concept is well-timed, and through its phenomenological descriptions this section does well to set up the normative argument for indirect reciprocity that Fritsch will soon move to.  But before doing this, and immediately after introducing the idea of reciprocity, Fritsch invokes Butler’s theory of cohabitation –  a theory which argues that Levinas’ distinction between my life and the lives of others is too strong – to gain support in order to help him begin his theory of indirect (or asymmetrical) reciprocity.  This interpretive reworking and clarification is needed because Levinas himself held a strongly negative view of the concept of reciprocity (92), and this caveat does well to demonstrate that Fritsch is well aware of the limitations of using Levinas to support his model  of reciprocity.

After introducing the basic idea of reciprocity in view of the ontological-normative claim that we exist fundamentally as past and future oriented (and constituted) beings, Fritsch expands the concept of reciprocity beyond its traditional mutualistic usage and argues that a tripartite understanding of reciprocity would better serve our ethical purposes.  That is, if we are to understand ourselves, ethically speaking, in terms of the concept of fecundity.  This tripartite usage of the concept of reciprocity a distinguishing factor that makes Fritsch’s model of indirect (asymmetrical) reciprocity distinctive. Indirect reciprocity is called “indirect” because the person that what I may owe is not limited exclusively to the person from whom I initially received something, but also to others. Traditional mutualistic ideas of reciprocity depend on the assumption that morally relevant parties will exist in a shared space of time and that the perspectives of morally relevant parties can be simply reversed.  They also depend upon the idea that the person who deserves reciprocity is the same person as the one who gave the first gift of exchange in the first place. However, Levinasian temporality and fecundity reveals this basic notion of reciprocity to be incomprehensive. Indirect reciprocity is a sense of reciprocity that cannot be distilled into a traditional form of simple, direct, presentist exchange, but instead extends beyond it. (94) This model of reciprocity calls for “giving back” to the future what is received from the past, even though the recipients of the gift are not the same as those who gave the gift in the first place.

Soon after these clarifications – and roughly halfway through the book – Fritsch introduces two major figures in the book: Derrida and Marcel Mauss.  Fritsch uses this middle portion to expound further on the idea of indirect reciprocity. He makes the case that because we are indebted to others from the past this should play a role in our giving to others in the future, even if the “gift” we give to future others is dramatically asymmetrical or altruistic.  Because of this second part, Fritsch argues that the notion of indirect reciprocity should be expanded into what he calls asymmetrical reciprocity. (107) Derrida’s critique of Levinas and The Gift by French sociologist Marcel Mauss figure heavily into this portion.

There are two critical elements to asymmetrical reciprocity that make it asymmetrical, and they form the bedrock of this distinctive way of thinking about IGJ. The traditional formulation of indirect reciprocity states that “(past) A gives to (present) B who ‘returns’ the gift to (future) C.” (108) Fritsch argues that this should be traditional formulation should be elaborated into asymmetrical reciprocity first because “if A’s gift is co-constitutive of B (i.e., is part of what allows B to be B), then B cannot ever fully repay the debt; full appropriation would amount to full self-annulment.  Thus, the gift remains inappropriable, excessive, and asymmetrical for B, who therefore must free herself from the debt in some way.” (108)  According to this argument one cannot fully repay a debt to the original donor without in some way substantially undermining or annulling their identity; the gift, and by extension the repayment, are inextricable from both the donor and the recipient. (Shades of the nonidentity problem appear here.)  The debt can only be repaid – in some way, shape, or form – to future others; other others than those who first gave the gift. The second element of asymmetrical reciprocity takes into consideration the excessive, overflowing characterr of this sort of debt.  Since this form of debt can never be fully returned to the original donor, this form of debt is always outstanding.  Thus, those in the present are always in the process of “giving back” to the future.  Thus, in this idea of continual future-oriented obligations constituting our normative being, we can see how this theory of asymmetrical reciprocity links up with Levinas’ of being as being-for-beyond-my-death.

Marcel Mauss is invoked in order to give a concrete sociocultural example of this sort of asymmetrical reciprocity standing at the center of a community’s ethos. Also Mauss is presumably used to suggest that since this sort of gift-receiving-and-giving can be witnessed in certain archaic cultures, then perhaps it can be used as a model of intergenerational relations for our modern world. In the cultures that Mauss studied the donor is not separable from the thing given, but also at the same time the donor is not taken to be the sole owner of the gift.  Instead the gift is understood to come from the clan, tribe, traditions, and ancestors. The recipient receives some of the donor’s spirit (in Maori hau or mana), and this spirit co-constitutes both donor and recipient. The obligation to reciprocate originates in the fact that in accepting the gift the recipient assimilates into themselves something that is fundamentally inassimilable (the mysterious elemental spirit of the gift), and thus it necessarily overflows them.  Because it overflows, it cannot but be passed on to future others, and in being passed on to the future it is in a sense returning to its own past.  This idea, as we can see, in many ways parallels the Levinasian structure of fecundity.  An ontological claim (that the gift itself is unassimilable) leads to a moral claim (that one should not try to make it theirs alone, but ought to pass it on.)  An example of this kind of gift would be food, for the food in one’s mouth – at least the kind of food that the cultures Mauss studies would eat – bespeaks the presence of ancestors; it would not come about without the gift inheritance of food-related gifts like tilled land, knowledge about farming, hunting, fishing, and so forth. (112) To account for the “return obligation,” that is, the obligation to pass the gift on, the gift is said to be imbued with an active spirit that wishes to return to its origin – to its clan, tribe, tradition, or ancestors. This model of socio-economy stands in marked contrast to the utility-maximizing agency that comprised the bedrock of Hobbes’ society, and indeed “the gift” offers an alternative model for the basis of the social contract.  For Mauss the foundation of society (at least in the one’s he reports on) is the gift that comes from the past and demands to be “returned” to future others.

Derrida is brought in to serve as a check on Mauss.  Derrida warns against Mauss’ “Rousseauist schema” which attempts to find an absolute bedrock of normativity in some far-off archaic origin.  Both Derrida and Mauss agree that there is an element of the “unpossessable” in the gift, but Derrida rejects Mauss’ foundationalism, and resists the idea that a singular normative origin can be found. Fritsch agrees that there is an issue with this sort of Rousseauism in Mauss – and that there is an issue in trying to identify a point of origin in normative life – but does not think it is sufficiently troublesome to motivate us to overlook the role that gifts play in intergenerational relations.  They allow us an opportunity to see a normativity that binds past generations to future generations, and thus are relevant to helping understand the nature of intergeneration normativity. Fritsch spends the rest of this chapter outlining more of Derrida’s thoughts about reciprocity and the gift, and defends his view against a variety of potential critiques.  He responds to the claim that asymmetrical reciprocity blurs the boundary between gift and exchange, and between private life and the world commerce, by suggesting (via Given Time) that this challenge – and challenges like this – presume the existence of utility-maximizing agents on the one hand, and the family one the other, whereas such a substantial distinction cannot be made.  (152).

The nuanced section on asymmetrical reciprocity nicely leads into the introduction of the second and final model of IGJ that Fritsch introduces: Turn-Taking.  While asymmetrical reciprocity is meant to show how the indebtedness to previous generations plays a role in our obligation to give to (and to care about the welfare of) future people, even if the gift is asymmetrical or altruistic, taking turns is meant to provide a model for intergenerational sharing of things that cannot be returned partially or incompletely.  That is, taking turns is concerned with holistic or quasi-holistic “objects” of sharing, such as the earth or nature.  Fritsch argues that there are three merits to the turn-taking model of IGJ. First, turn-taking demonstrates that there are ways other than the reciprocity of the gift that, normatively speaking, take into account the ontological presence of the dead and the unborn in our lives.  Secondly, turn-taking is better with respect to quasi-holistic and holistic object in a way that reciprocity is not, because reciprocity implies owing to the future an “equivalent among substitutables” and needs a “common metric to calculate such equivalents.” (155) Reciprocity is inadequate when discussing holistic objects such as the natural environment, the earth, or nature, because substitutability is not a principle that can easily applied to such totalizing entities. However, turn-taking can account for how to treat such holistic objects. Finally, taking turns better treats questions of intergenerational justice as inherently political questions. By citing Aristotle’s Politics Fritsch argues that this is so because a fundamental model of justice relies on the sharing of nonsubstitutable political offices. Turn-taking, Fritsch argues, is the model that free equals ought to take when attempting to share an object that is not divisible like a cake. (155) Fritsch notes this this basic idea of taking turns has received hardly any attention in the IGJ literature, and – in a very general way – this is surprising since this idea can be applied to a wide range of things, from political offices to the earth itself.  It is a model that provides a helpful way of thinking about IGJ in the context of holistic, indivisible, intergenerational objects, and for this reason it is a needed (and a very helpful) contribution to this book.

In a method not unlike that one found in the portion on asymmetrical reciprocity, which relied on the temporality of the “time of life and death” to reconceive of past-present-future obligations, in this chapter on turn-taking Fritsch invokes Derrida to deconstruct (“depresentify”) presentism, and to reconceptualize life as a matter of “lifedeath,” or even as “lifedeathbirth.” (161) This is meant to aid in understanding the ontologically connected, co-constitutive nature of the relation between living and nonliving generations.

After a few more forays through Derrida and Aristotle, Fritsch turns towards clarifying precisely what he means by turn-taking by laying out his model of “double turn-taking.” It has two components in its most general formulation: T1 and T2.  T1 is the turning of the self back towards itself over time.  “Given the noncoincidence of time, no identity is simply given.  Any self must, from the beginning, seek to return to itself, promising itself to its future self.” The second part of the turn is T2, which takes into account the differential contexts that the self passes through, but which are always constitutive of the self in the first place.  This is the turn toward the other: “To affirm oneself as oneself is to affirm the context without which one could not be what one is, and that means to welcome unconditionally the future to-come as an alterity within itself.” (167)  This two-step model of turn-taking can be applied specifically to intergenerational relations, but also to environment issues.  For the former, intergenerational relations, the attempted self-return would take place in and through birth from previous generations, and the turn towards the other takes place insofar as we turn towards the next generation.  For the latter, the environment, the attempted self-return takes place by the consumption of biospherical resources, and the turn towards the other is the turn towards the earth upon death and also through life’s continuous exchange with nature. (173)

In summary of this discussion of double turn-taking Fritsch says “saying yes to turn-taking means accepting that I receive power from previous others and will leave it to others.” (173)  In general the idea of turn-taking being an appropriate model for intergenerational sharing of holistic objects seems good and well-justified, however the level of theoretical detail and distinction-adding in this chapter seems unnecessary, and at times it seems to obfuscate the main point of turn-taking rather than clarifying it.

Final Comments

This general critique mentioned in the previous paragraph applies throughout this book.  In this book, as hopefully I have able to show in this review, there are many excellent, lucid, and compelling sections.  The early section on ontological problems in IGJ, the middle section on Levinas and fecundity, and the following section on Mauss and asymmetrical reciprocity were each particularly clear, well-argued, and engaging.  However, these rich and rewarding veins of thought are often buried beneath mounds of distinctions, caveats, and repetitions. Sometimes it gets hard to dig through, because the essential matter of the main argument is not always separated from additional theoretical matter. Moreover, the book tends to go on a bit longer than needed and to lose steam at the end. Chapter four – the section which introduces turn-taking as a model of IGJ – gives way to a chapter five.  This final chapter, while fascinating if standing on its own, seems primarily to turn around and rehash ideas previously covered in a way that is not terribly helpful to the overall experience of the book. This chapter concerns itself with life as lifedeath and the terrestrial claim over the corpse, both ideas which were previously covered. At this point I only have a few tiny, almost trifling critiques. First, there is a slight tendency to introduce very complex issues and then to simply say “I will not be able to discuss these interpretations here.” (115, for example) This leads to bit of expectation disappointment. Secondly, there is also a slight tendency to compile lists of “ists” and isms,” sometimes almost seemingly for its own sake. (212, for example.) This is certainly not a big deal, but just worth noting.

If the preponderance of critique that I offer about this book is in the form of writing critique, and anodyne critique at that, then that speaks to the strength of this book as a strong work philosophical scholarship.  Philosophically, I only suggested a concern about Fritsch’s use of “moral corruption” (which I mentioned in my 4th paragraph), and a concern about the idea of “self” that Fritsch is employing (which I mentioned in my 5th paragraph). This book is tremendously well-researched and takes pains to be sure that no theoretical stone goes unturned.  Appropriate sources are consulted at appropriate times, and the limitations of claims are clearly articulated.  More importantly, this book addresses a pressing ethical issue in our world today. What do we owe to future others, especially in view of our growing knowledge about climate issues?  If Fritsch is right, then we owe a lot, and certainly much more than many people take the time to consider that we do.  And we owe this to the future because of who, how, and, perhaps most importantly shown by this book, where we are.  Taking Turns With the Earth offers a vast reservoir of theoretical material to help us re-conceptualize the nature of our ontological and normative relation to both past and future noncontempories, and it demands that we pay attention to our status as interpersonal beings always living in the time of life and death. In doing so it calls for us to develop our ethical self-understanding, and this call is not just thrown out haphazardly.  Instead, this call is motivated and supported by astute philosophical argumentation.

Harald Seubert (Hg.): Neunzig Jahre ›Sein und Zeit‹: Die fundamentalontologische Frage nach dem Sinn von Sein, Alber, 2019

Neunzig Jahre ›Sein und Zeit‹ Couverture du livre Neunzig Jahre ›Sein und Zeit‹
Martin-Heidegger-Gesellschaft Schriftenreihe Band 12
Harald Seubert (Hg.)
Karl Alber Verlag
2019
Hardback 39,00 €
312

Gabor Csepregi: In Vivo: A Phenomenology of Life-Defining Moments, McGill Queen University Press, 2019

In Vivo: A Phenomenology of Life-Defining Moments Couverture du livre In Vivo: A Phenomenology of Life-Defining Moments
Gabor Csepregi
McGill Queen University Press
2019
216

Diego D’Angelo: Zeichenhorizonte: Semiotische Strukturen in Husserls Phänomenologie der Wahrnehmung, Springer, 2019

Zeichenhorizonte: Semiotische Strukturen in Husserls Phänomenologie der Wahrnehmung Couverture du livre Zeichenhorizonte: Semiotische Strukturen in Husserls Phänomenologie der Wahrnehmung
Phaenomenologica, Volume 228
Diego D’Angelo
Springer
2019
Hardback 63,17 €
X, 382

John Shand (Ed.): A Companion to Nineteenth Century Philosophy, Wiley-Blackwell, 2019

A Companion to Nineteenth Century Philosophy Couverture du livre A Companion to Nineteenth Century Philosophy
John Shand (Ed.)
Wiley-Blackwell
2019
Hardback £140.00
528