Ron Margolin: Inner Religion in Jewish Sources: A Phenomenology of Inner Religious Life and Its Manifestation from the Bible to Hasidic Texts

Inner Religion in Jewish Sources: A Phenomenology of Inner Religious Life and Its Manifestation from the Bible to Hasidic Texts Book Cover Inner Religion in Jewish Sources: A Phenomenology of Inner Religious Life and Its Manifestation from the Bible to Hasidic Texts
Emunot: Jewish Philosophy and Kabbalah
Ron Margolin. Translated by Edward Levin
Academic Studies Press
2021
Hardcover
620

Reviewed by: Yutong Li (Hoger Instituut voor Wijsbegeerte, KU Leuven)

Inner Religion in Jewish Sources: A Phenomenology of Inner Religious Life and Its Manifestation from the Bible to Hasidic Texts, trans. Eduard Levin, Boston: Academic Studies Press, 2021 (shortened as Inner Religion hereafter), presented before us by Professor Ron Margolin, is an informative handbook with abounding materials. The thesis Margolin offers to defend is a simple one, and he defends it through this hefty book of 600 pages. The thesis is, despite criticisms issued from other religious or secular groups, Judaism is a tradition that holds a high regard for the interior, intrinsic, or immanent features of religious consciousness. Put in other words, the Jewish people’s observing of the commandments or of maintaining the love for God, is not triggered by fear, nor motivated by outer purposes (physical, social, political, etc.). Their piety results from inner experiences and aspires after inner goals, e.g., the cultivation of their own souls.

To defend this religious thesis, however, Margolin treads the detour of phenomenology. On the one hand, it is a natural choice, since this philosophical tradition lays its emphasis on reduction, givenness, consciousness, and so on, prioritizing subjective experiences to objective validities. On the other hand, nonetheless, Margolin disagrees with the majority of the phenomenologists of religion and theology: van der Leeuw, Levinas, Chrétien, among others. This independent spirit, which, by the way, surpasses the scope of phenomenology and also applies itself to the domain of the research of Jewish mysticism (whose forerunners, above all Gershom Scholem and Idel Moshe, become the targets of sober criticism in many places of Inner Religion), is one of the features that render this book a good read. There are deficiencies, indeed, as will be addressed at the end of the review, but they will by no means prevent readers from appreciating the meticulous interpretative efforts Margolin dedicates to the defending of whatever he tries to defend.

In this article, I will first go over the key concepts (inner, interiority, interiorization) and, second, three of the instantiations (ritual, conceptual, and experiential interiorization) of inner religion. The length of my review will prevent me from reproducing the material abundance waiting for readers in Margolin’s work, but this needs not to be done, due to the nature of the monograph (a handbook, as mentioned in the beginning): instead of arguments piling up on one another, the book, an anthology, rather, consists of a singular overarching principle applied to a variety of literatures. Thirdly, I will comment on the methodology adopted in this book in general (phenomenology and others). At last, as predicted, I will raise a critical remark that concerns in particular the problem of history, which, I believe, is not treated as a problem per se, despite the historical appearance of the work (it is, after all, a commentary on materials from the Bible to Hasidic texts).

Before we start the thematic discussions, however, I should notify the readers of one underlying attitude of this review article. Given the nature of the journal, I will focus primarily on the phenomenological part of Inner Religion, although it occupies a somewhat marginal place in the book. One should not fail to notice that this monograph pertains, to a larger extent, to the studies of Jewish religion and theology. Its central mission, as just mentioned, consists in the apologetics for the Judaic religion, instead of working out an elaborate systematics of phenomenology. It goes without saying that the abundance of sources from the Jewish background does not at all obstruct the phenomenological potentials of the study, but, on the contrary, opens up a new perspective for philosophy. However, this pre-emptive reminder is still needed for the purpose of helping the readers establish a fitting attitude toward Inner Religion: To be found within is, I repeat, not architectonics composed of Husserlian or Heideggerian jargons, but an applied phenomenology that mobilizes the fundamental methods or conceptual framework in the field of religion.

Ambiguity of the term inner

The most crucial term of Inner Religion, is, naturally, “inner”. The Hebrew language has several terms that connotes what Margolin means by it. A metaphorical and hence the most straightforward one is the word lev [heart] (35), but the same idea can be expressed by more theoretical or epistemological jargons, whose exemplar specimen is the word Kavanah [intent] (36-37). This concept connotes proactive planning (87) or attentiveness (89).

A spacial metaphor itself, the equivocal notion “inner” harbors a leeway of interpretation. There are several options that appear thematically or unthematically throughout Inner Religion. First, inner as mental or psychological, as opposed to somatic or physical; one practices belief for the good of her soul, not to strengthen her body. Second, inner as subjective or self, as opposed to objective or others. Third, inner as private, as opposed to public; faith is best tested when one is isolated from the crowd. Fourth, inner as inherent, as opposed to instrumental; religion should be intrinsically good, not a tool to seek respect or other social benefits. Fifth, inner as immanent, as opposed to transcendent; God is dwelling in men’s souls, so there is no need to search for Him outside of oneself, a credo reminiscent of St. Augustine’s teaching. Granted, these understandings of the term «inner» partially overlap with one another. For example, mental, subjective/self, and private are used quite interchangeably by the author in the introductory chapter. But they have different connotations with regard to their oppositions.

Margolin does not intent to categorically distinguish these multiple significations, but he knows how to discern the inner he wants in numerous religious phenomena: “most importantly, this book will focus on practices that the religious individual perceives as means to stand before, or to make contact with, the divine” (13). Where certain events or testimonies attest to one’s—immanent—direct union with the divine, there is inner religion. Two remarks to be made here. First, the innerness Margolin has in mind presents itself, paradoxically, in transcendent or ecstatic experiences. Second, this transcendence is nevertheless not referring to anything really exterior, outside of one’s soul or consciousness, but precisely manifested within interiority. In other words, special attention will be given to the experience of union with divinity, but it is a transcending union as perceived by the mind of an individual: a transcendence from the point of view of immanence.

Interiorization

Margolin, however, does not let this overtly reductive approach develop into a full-blown annulment of the demarcation between the inner and outer. Indeed, the insistence on the distinction between, i.e., the claim that all interiority does not correspond with an outer expression, is what distinguishes Margolin from other phenomenologists. This gives rise to a difficulty, namely whether there is an enclosed domain of interiority, a private spiritual sphere absolutely insulated from outer influences, forming an empire within an empire.

The tendency to espouse this substantial reading, proposing a static, fixed, or idealistic conception of men’s interiority, is an attitude not unlike that of the phenomenological eidetic method in early Husserl. Nevertheless, Margolin does point out yet another way to talk about the inner, which assists to avert the criticism. Instead of substantiating an interiority, he mentions the term «interiorization», referring to “the process of change that occurs within a given religious culture, when the center of attention is shifted from the ‘objective world’ of nature or myth to the ‘subjective world’ of the individual’s psyche” (15). The wording “center of attention” here echoes on another plane the author’s phenomenological method: inner religion proposes a change in attitude, not an ontological claim about some self-sufficient inner space. The outer perception is not simply cancelled out in favor of the inner, but rather regarded as an achievement, a constitution of it. To be more precise, the religious texts that pertain to outer qualities can be (re-)interpreted as metaphorical language that, at the end of the day, alludes back to the inner ones. As Margolin notes down: “The term ‘interiorization’ presumes a transition from outer to inner perception, but the assumed existence of a developmental transition does not necessarily mean the prevalence of inner perception. Often, both perceptions continue to coexist.” (15)

Three kinds of interiorization

The body of Inner Religion is carried out in three parts, each explicating on one or several possible forms of interiorization: ritual, experiential, and conceptual, existential, and epistemological interiorization. Since the space here is limited, I will focus on the first three of these possibilities: ritual interiorization, conceptual interiorization, and experiential interiorization.

First, in line with the author, I start with the rituals, and I believe there is a reason for doing so. The author can best demonstrate his claim if even in rituals, often believed to be social and public events, there can be found elements of inner religion. Second, I single out what is called «conceptual interiorization» because Margolin considers this idea as one of his contributions to the discussion of inner religion. Third, I reverse the order of experiential and conceptual interiorization, because it is in the former that Margolin’s polemical tone reaches a high point, which allows us to more easily situate the author in the traditions both of phenomenology and of the studies of Jewish mysticism.

Ritual interiorization

The technical term «interiorization» mentioned above first manifests itself in the phenomena of ritual and customs. Due to their public features, the practices of rituals and customs permit at the outset no enclosed domain of interiority, but an interplay between the outer and the inner. Or to be more precise: public and exterior in the first place, religious rituals have nevertheless the potential to let their participants focus back on themselves, on the well-being of their souls, instead of that of the bodies that are actually carrying rituals out.

In the beginning of the chapter in question, “Ritual Interiorization and Intent for Commandments”, Margolin invokes an understanding of rituals opposite to his own. In this view, ritual is defined as “a category of standardized behavior (custom) in which the relationship between the means and the end is not ‘intrinsic’, i.e. is either irrational or non-rational” (proposed by Jack Goody, quoted in Inner Religion, 61; emphasis mine) This definition hinges on a merely extrinsic relation “between the means and the end”. We now will see how Margolin argues for the contrary with the aid of Jewish sources. There are several steps in ritual interiorization, as can be seen in the formalization of rites, a process that dates back to the Scripture, and through the prophets and rabbis, reaches its pinnacle in the mystics and Hasidim.

The first step is the replacement of rituals that are more demanding or cruel with ones less so. The Torah already initiates a nascent form of ritual interiorization, which is especially patent in the story of the Binding of Isaac. It is a well-known tale: God demands Abraham to sacrifice Issac, but in the last moment, when Abraham was raising his knife and ready to kill his only son, God sends him a ram, instructing him to perform an animal sacrifice instead. The sanguinary rite is preserved, but, at least from an anthropocentric point of view, it becomes more humane. In line with Martin Buber, Margolin interprets this episode as a demonstration that “God wants the intent and not the actual act” (82) The actual, material, actions being carried out or not, it is men’s sincerity and good faith that count.

The history has seen the intensification of the figure of Abraham, who gradually becomes a figure that not only embodies a sincere intent, but, through his love alone, had fulfilled the entire Torah even before God gave it to human beings. This can be read in, for example, in  R. Menahem Mendel, a grand-disciple of Baal Shem Tov, the founder of Hasidic Judaism: “with a single attribute, namely, love, he fulfilled the entire Torah” (quoted in Inner Religion, 151). The Hasidim “attack the rabbinic formalistic conceptions, which assume that the commandments do not require intent, by imparting inner content to the halakhah” (156), manage to fulfill the incipient tendency of interiorization in the Bible. Hasidism, with its disobedient attitude, exploits ritual interiorization to an unprecedented degree. Here, rituals become a method to intensify the experiential dimension, without eliminating the social, public, objective elements of religion, only aiming to refer therefrom back to its men’s soul: “The method of ritual interiorization adopted by the early Hasidic masters maintained the external religious ritual while infusing the fulfillment of the commandments with inner meaning.” (156) The consequence of this method is twofold: the outer forms are retained, but transformed, e.g., from the original human sacrifices to prayers in the end, and it is now permeated with subjective significance, with intent.

Conceptual interiorization

Margolin offers a special treatment to the phenomenon of “conceptual interiorization”, regarding it as an independent category that, in his opinion, shares the same right with “epistemological interiorizations, existential challenges of religious life, inward focusings” (276).

The particularity about conceptual interiorization is that it establishes an inner religion not through religious or in particular mystic experiences, but via the mediation of the interpretation of statements or concepts in religious texts. (In fact, I would go one step forward and describe this practice as “interiorization through interpretations”, not just through conceptualization). By this conceptual labor, it transforms “sanctified myths, laws, and narratives in the conceptual formulations that mainly emphasize the inner meanings relevant to every person” (276).

Margolin begins to elaborate conceptual interiorization by quoting Nachmanides’s commentary on one passage in Book of Deuteronomy, which is translated in English as: “Do what is right and good in the sight of the Lord, that it may go well with you…” (Deut. 6:18; Inner Religion, 277) Nachmanides’s exegesis goes like this: “Also when He did not command you, think to do what is good and right in His sight, for He loves what is good and right.” (Inner Religion, 277) In Margolin’s reading, this interpretation expends the original semantics of the biblical statement in a way that favors inner faithfulness to merely exterior or instrumental observations of the commandments. The hinge of Nachmanides’s explanation lies in the phrase “do what is right and good”. Similar wordings can be found, e.g., in Psalms, “Do good, O Lord, to the good, to the upright in heart” (Ps. 125:4; Inner Religion, 277; emphasis mine). In Rabbinic teachings, “‘Do what is right and good’—this refers to a compromise, acting beyond the strict demands of the law⁠1. We should then be able to notice that, by drawing associations between the biblical passages and rabbis’ teachings, Nachmanides harvests an inner reading of the Law, a reading that instructs people to act well even in the absence of laws and commandments (“Also when He did not command you…”).

Experiential interiorization

However, although Margolin esteems the conceptual approach to interiorization as an independent form of inner religion, he does not fail to point out that there is an antagonistic, i.e., non-conceptual method, which is as legitimate as those immanent interpretations. In fact, the chapters about the non-conceptual or non-verbal interiorization, that is, about “paranormal experiences” and “introspective contemplation and inward focusing” (chapter 2 and 3), antecede the one that evolves around the conceptual counterpart (chapter 4). I invert the sequence in the review article on purpose to, I hope, show that Margolin’s own emphasis lies on the former. If language, concepts, and interpretations should indeed have their fair share in the Jewish inner religion, they can nonetheless never eclipse the pre-linguistic or pre-predicative religious experience.

The discussion of experiential interiorization, instantiate by contemplation and inward focusing, appears in the middle of a scholarly debate as to how to interpret the ecstatic experience documented in the Heikhalot literature (233-234). Pioneers in this field of research, above all Gershom Scholem and Idel Moshe, have set the keynote: this experience reflects a “mystic ascent” (233) that leads one away from oneself. Margolin, however, chooses to side with the opposite interpretation, as proposed by Rabbi Hai Gaon, which tones down the exterior or self-alienating dimension of ecstatic experience but emphasizes its immanent character: those who experience ecstasy do not depart from the body, but have visions precisely “in the chambers of their hearts”. (235) As Margolin puts it: “‘Ascent to Heaven’ is therefore an expression of an inner experience of the consciousness of a fierce inner sensation of ascent and detachment from the body; but we need not assign it a meaning of changed outer, spatial location.” (237)

That being said, it is worth noticing that the pre-linguistic and inner faithfulness is, once again, registered in a linguistic or ritual practice: the reciting of the prayers. Therefore, this particular religious practice brings  the three kinds of interiorization together. Prayer is a ritual; it is linguistic (and therefore open to interpretation); and it, as just said, elicits experience. The discussion of prayer is scattered over multiple chapters and sections in the book. It appears first when the author is handling the issue of intent and rituals (chapter 1), returns when he talks about inward focusing (chapter 2), and emerges again in the end where he critically situates himself within the tradition of phenomenology (Afterword). Moreover, prayers should be distinguished in different kinds. Scholars have proposed diverse distinctions (for example, see the discussion on p.91-95), but Margolin chooses to draw it by—like everywhere else in the book—the scale of interiority: There are outer prayers, and there are inner prayers. This particular dichotomy incarnates his problems within the phenomenological tradition.

Apparently, Margolin regards this distinction as significant, since he, after all the discussions of the body, comes back to it in the afterword. The discussion of prayers, the distinction between inner and outer prayer, also allows Margolin to situate himself, albeit in a critical manner, within the phenomenological tradition. He contrasts his own idea with that of a French phenomenologist of religion, Jean-Louis Chrétien, whom the author of Inner Religion accuses of “not distinguish[ing] between different types of prayer, focusing rather on what he sees as the fundamental element common to all prayers: standing before the transcendental Thou.” (519) The same fault is registered in an earlier phenomenologist, Emmanuel Levinas, who is, according to Margolin, still too obsessed with the transcendent Otherness likewise. (518)

Immediately after the polemic, Margolin reasserts the existence of two, not merely one, kinds of prayers. He defines them as such: Outer prayer is that which is “directed to the transcendent Thou who stands opposite him, for the fulfilling of his [the reciter of the prayer] desires”, while inner prayer is represented in “an act of self-negation or negation of the consciousness” (519). There is nothing surprising anymore about this central claim of Margolin’s; the prominence of the interiority of religious experience has been established by the abundant materials Margolin offers so far. However, there is still one consequence to be addressed, a consequence that surpasses the mere intellectual debate regarding which is the preferable, the inner or the outer dimension, but that bears an existential significance. We should not fail to recognize between the lines in this afterword that the term “outer”, and mutandis mutatis, “inner”, adopt a very specific meaning. Not that bodies or rituals or commandments or social recognition are outer, but God Himself, the transcendent divinity, is the ultimately outer element. Combined with the appeal for the coming back to “inner religion”, this equation of outer with transcendent has a theo- and anthropological importance. To put it in more phenomenological (and less controversial) terms, inner religion brackets the validity of the transcendent in its reductive regression to men’s religious experiences. This humanistic undertone makes itself tangible in many places of the book, for instance, in his discussions of the Zoharic doctrine “the awakening below results in the awakening above” (314-318) as well as his retelling of Etty Hillesum’s diary: “I shall try to help You, God, to stop my strength ebbing away […] You cannot help us, that we must help You to help ourselves.” (537)

Methodology

Margolin’s debate about prayers with other phenomenologists, moreover, allows us to draw a clearer association between his own project and the phenomenological tradition. This, however, is a problematic relationship. Indeed, as said above, the phenomenological method is apt for the subject matter of this book: inner religion. The emphasis on intentional consciousness and subjective experience enables the author, first, to revitalize the debate about the distinction of pure interiority and pure exteriority (5), and second, to bracket “everything except the reality of the self” (21): while the first reflects the gist of the concept of intentionality, the second, that of reduction. Nevertheless, although he evidently follows the method of reduction, Margolin harbors a quite special idea when it comes to the inner-outer problem. For one, he persists in the distinction between the inner and the outer, although it has been put in doubt by van der Leeuw (“here can be no inner without the outer”, 2). For another, as said just now, he stringently restricts himself within the domain of interiority, keeping the transcendent out of discussion, in contrast to Levinas and Chrétien’s approach. These polemics distinctly locate Margolin’s phenomenology in the historical map of the phenomenology of religion.

Notably, however, the strictly descriptive, eidetic, science of consciousness that Husserl establishes in his earlier career is not the exclusive approach the author adopts. Strictly speaking, the author of Inner Religion uses three methods instead of one, the other two being comparative study of religion and hermeneutics. I do not want to go into details regarding the other strategies but am satisfied with pointing out their most fundamental traits: by comparative study of religion, I mean the method used to demonstrate a fact in a particular religion by gathering data from other religious traditions; by hermeneutics, the (re-)interpretation of a passage such that the original text proves whatever the author tries to show. That said, let me tarry a little longer with the first of these two methods, because it reveals one of Margolin’s underlying principles.

That comparative religion is contestable (48), does not prevent Margolin from carrying on with this method. He starts each chapter in this book with an overview of world religions, and believes himself justified in doing so because “[similar] religious phenomena occur in distant parts of the globe and in different historical periods” (48-49), and the term religion indubitably “[denotes] a universal phenomenon” (49). There is undoubtedly a universalistic undertone in the application of the comparative method in Margolin, who explicitly claims that his aim is “to highlight the common denominators of religious phenomena throughout the world” (49). Particularly, as pertains to the scope of this book, the author finds out that there exists in world religions a highly similar tendency to approve of the inner dimension of religious consciousness: “the types of rites in Hinduism and Judaism, for example, they both demonstrate interiorization: the attention of people performing Hindu and Jewish rites shifts from the (‘objective’) world to the (‘subjective’) mind and soul.” (49) Margolin is convinced that the subject matter of his study, men’s interiority, grants him permission to treat different religions in different peoples, at least in this respect, alike. A book centered on the “Jewish sources”, Margolin’s research is however not confined in Judaism alone. The result is transferable to all human beings:

Comparisons of Western interiorization processes with those typical of the Eastern religions, most evident in the Chinese Tao and in Buddhism, also strengthen our understanding that interiorization processes are not dependent on any specific religious worldview. (Margolin, 2021, 522)

A history of the a-historical?

However, we might wonder whether the universalistic understanding of interiority will cause a substantial problem that can undermine the genre of historical research in general, of which Margolin’s study seems a part. Since this book ranges over a span from Bible to Hasidism, readers might expect that it must take into consideration the temporal elements within the development of Judaism, that the author must encounter the diachronic aspect of what he calls “inner religion”. The opposite, however, seems to be the case. The inner, due to the very fact that it is inner and not outer, has in the first place been insulated from the plurality and mutability of empirical ethnicities and religious traditions. For that which has no history but universality, there is only compilation and no historical research.

In line with Idel Moshe, Margolin clearly regards himself as a contestant of Gershom Scholem, the founder of historical science of Jewish mysticism, and sides with Martin Buber in the Buber-Scholem polemics. Margolin’s criticism is centered on how to interpret Hasidism. He criticizes Scholem of going too far in his rebuke of Buber, of negating the whole existential dimension in Hasidism (102, footnote 174; see also 430 and 445), although from time to time, he tries to reconcile his approach with Scholem’s (see, e.g., 27, where Margolin comments in a favorable tone: “To a large degree, Scholem’s work was based on his desire to uncover the experiential inner dimensions of the Jewish religion.”). However, his difference with Scholem has yet another fundamental dimension, which pertains not to the problem of existentialism, but to history. The author of Inner Religion does not explicitly point it out in this book, but already addressed it in an earlier paper (Margolin 2007) — not sufficiently, however, as will be discussed in what follows.

As Margolin also sees it, tradition and history, that is, the diachronical dimension, of the Jewish religion plays a crucial part in Scholem’s reading of mystic experiences. For example, in the opening chapter of his masterpiece, Major Trends in Jewish Mysticism, “There is no mysticism as such, there is only the mysticism of a particular religious system[.]”(Scholem 1971, 6) Indeed, despite this contextualistic attitude, Scholem acknowledges the universal experiences that are able to unify all mystics regardless of the different traditions, but he also warns his readers not to exaggerate it, a danger in which the modern age is too willing to indulge in. (ibid.) A danger, indeed, to which Margolin may be already exposed.

In both the earlier essay and the recent monograph, Margolin holds a simplistic reading of history that goes hand in hand with his minimalist adaptation of phenomenology. Just as he limits his phenomenology in the study of the static human psyche, history as he conceives it is but a compilation of empirical and exterior facts. His phenomenological analyses, correspondingly, consist in the elaboration of men’s (first-)personal feelings as such and all the other psychological complex happening directly within subjectivity, while the historical ones are conceived as non-phenomenological enterprises that assign those experiences to objective elements: environment, society, historical events, etc., which, at best, harbor an indirect relation with individuals. History in this sense, as an instance of inauthenticity, becomes an easy target, for it surpasses the domain of the intrapersonal consciousness. But a later Husserl would argue that history, in fact, adds an interpersonal or intersubjective dimension to phenomenology, an equally or even more constitutive component without which nothing individual, personal, or “inner”, can emerge.

Therefore, Scholem’s historical attitude, although it is not really new and criticized by Margolin, keeps reminding us of a fundamental problem: to which extent is Margolin’s universalistic and, indeed, ahistorical, treatment of inner religion justified? If we come back to the distinction between interiority and interiorization, men’s soul or spirit — this ideal interior space — might have no history, but the painstaking process of excavating it or coming back to it has one: Just like dots, lines, planes and all other eidetic mathematical objects do not permit developments, but mathematics as a discipline in history are perpetually subject to the governance of mutations. In fact, despite all the universalistic attitude, the author still makes a, however minimal, historical claim that borders on teleology. From Bible to Hasidim, there is after all a history of ascent: first hidden between the lines in the Bible, the interiority of religion was gradually excavated by prophets and rabbis, and this movement of turning inside finally reached its pinnacle in Kabbalah and especially Hasidism in the 18th century. Inner religion is a phenomenon whose embryo already appears in the earliest religious scriptures, but its growth requires a whole complex system of irrigation that entails ritual, conceptual, experiential, existential, epistemological operations. However, without any comparison with other eras, we could not understand what Hasidim really contributes to Judaism and to religions in general. The a-historical attitude which suggests that they are fulfilling a universal mission, a platonic idea of inner religion, does not really explain to us the particular reason why human beings should choose this moment, and not in others, not earlier in the Bible itself, to push the process of interiority to its extreme. To look for insights in this, we still have to turn to Scholem, and not Inner Religion. What this book offers us is a comprehensive reader, a neat elaboration of all the human psyches, as well as human endeavors to search for connections with God. The author lays out before us a vast map of religious consciousness but hides from us its depth.

To be clear, this judgement is not at all a criticism of Margolin’s contribution to our understanding of Judaism as an inner religion. It is a matter of choice, or a matter of perspective. Margolin chooses to write the book in a horizontal and static way, not vertical or genetic. But this choice is made from a phenomenological point of view, and it bears consequence to our understanding of phenomenology, so I choose to split hairs with Margolin’s phenomenology. Hairs are to split because, although the debate about Hasidism in particular and the Jewish religion in general might sound peripheral for many phenomenologists, yet the problem of history carries weight with phenomenological researches: how do we do phenomenology after Husserl, how do we do it when even he himself realizes the problem behind his static and eidetic method?

 

Bibliography

Margolin, Ron. 2007. ‘Moshe Idel’s Phenomenology and Its Sources’. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 6 (18): 41–51.

———. 2021. Inner Religion in Jewish Sources: A Phenomenology of Inner Religious Life and Its Manifestation from the Bible to Hasidic Texts. Translated by Edward Levin. Boston: Academic Studies Press.

Scholem, Gershom. 1971. Major Trends in Jewish Mysticism. New York: Schocken Books.


1 BT Bava Metzia, 108a10; translation Levin. In fact, the anomic tone becomes  more patent in translation of Koran Noé Talmud: “One should not perform an action that is not right and good, even if he is legally entitled to do so.” (Quotation taken from: https://www.sefaria.org/Bava_Metzia.108a.10?lang=bi&with=Translations&lang2=en, accessed November 2021).

Philip Flock: Das Phänomenologische und das Symbolische: Marc Richirs Phänomenologie der Sinnbildung, Springer, 2021

Das Phänomenologische und das Symbolische: Marc Richirs Phänomenologie der Sinnbildung Book Cover Das Phänomenologische und das Symbolische: Marc Richirs Phänomenologie der Sinnbildung
Phaenomenologica, Vol. 234
Philip Bastian Flock
Springer
2021
Hardback 77,75 €
X, 338

Ron Margolin: Inner Religion in Jewish Sources: A Phenomenology of Inner Religious Life and Its Manifestation from the Bible to Hasidic Texts, Academic Studies Press, 2021

Inner Religion in Jewish Sources: A Phenomenology of Inner Religious Life and Its Manifestation from the Bible to Hasidic Texts Book Cover Inner Religion in Jewish Sources: A Phenomenology of Inner Religious Life and Its Manifestation from the Bible to Hasidic Texts
Emunot: Jewish Philosophy and Kabbalah
Ron Margolin. Translated by Edward Levin
Academic Studies Press
2021
Hardback $159.00
700

Alexander Schnell: Seinsschwingungen: Zur Frage nach dem Sein in der transzendentalen Phänomenologie, Mohr Siebeck, 2020

Seinsschwingungen: Zur Frage nach dem Sein in der transzendentalen Phänomenologie Book Cover Seinsschwingungen: Zur Frage nach dem Sein in der transzendentalen Phänomenologie
Philosophische Untersuchungen 50
Alexander Schnell
Mohr Siebeck
2020
Paperback 74,00 €
XV, 227

Kenneth Knies: Crisis and Husserlian Phenomenology, Bloomsbury, 2020

Crisis and Husserlian Phenomenology: A Reflection on Awakened Subjectivity Book Cover Crisis and Husserlian Phenomenology: A Reflection on Awakened Subjectivity
Kenneth Knies
Bloomsbury Academic
2020
Hardback £76.50
256

Judith Wambacq: Thinking between Deleuze and Merleau-Ponty

Thinking between Deleuze and Merleau-Ponty Book Cover Thinking between Deleuze and Merleau-Ponty
Series in Continental Thought, № 51
Judith Wambacq
Ohio University Press · Swallow Press
2018
Hardback $95.00
296

Reviewed by: Alex de Campos Moura (University of São Paulo)

The Transcendental Project in Merleau-Ponty and Deleuze

I. Introduction: The Question

Judith Wamback’s book, Thinking between Deleuze and Merleau-Ponty, proposes a highly original reading of two central authors from the 20th century, one that sheds new light on their most important insights.

According to the Wamback herself, she is reacting to a consensus that has been established about the relation between the two thinkers, a consensus that sees their respective works as being either alien or in opposition to each other. This reading of their relationship was championed not only by Foucault but also by Deleuze himself, in his few and mostly negative comments on Merleau-Ponty. As Wamback shows, Deleuze does not seem to recognize either in phenomenology in general or in Merleau-Ponty’s work in particular the main sources of his thought.

Against this interpretation, Wamback explicitly proposes to find a philosophical argument that legitimates bringing them into proximity. She is not, therefore, interested in reconstructing the common history of their reception or perhaps in uncovering a heretofore ignored biographical connection; on the contrary, what she seeks is to make explicit a conceptual connection between two thinkers that critics—including Deleuze himself—have become used to seeing as radically alien. This is the central motivation of this book, one that is also central in evaluating the relevance of its implications.

In order to bring this project to fruition, Wamback proposes a precise framework, which she herself describes as “metaphysically” bent, and which takes up a classical philosophical question, namely the question of the relation between being and thought. She investigates the way both thinkers understand this question, thus providing the ground for her attempted rapprochement.

Indeed, as the book progresses, this question becomes increasingly more precise, and the way Wamback frames and focuses her discussion, notable for its clarity, is one of the main strengths of the book. The debate about the status of thought is revealed as a discussion about the transcendental project behind each thinker’s work, highlighting the intrinsic relation between this project and what Wamback describes as a “philosophy of immanence.” This philosophy of immanence is, according to her, a central dimension of both philosophers’ thoughts, one that brings to the forefront the necessity of understanding the articulation between the transcendental and the immanence.

Wamback, therefore, centers her comparison on the idea that Deleuze and Merleau-Ponty both recognized an immanence between the condition and the conditioned, one that finds its privileged “place” in the notions of expression and simultaneity. This is the central thesis defended by this book, an original and unusual contribution when considered against the backdrop of most studies dedicated to this topic. Let us then examine the way Wamback organizes her book.

II. The Path

In order to accomplish her proposal, Wamback delineates five main steps, thus establishing a work method that is followed throughout the book and that structures the overall path of the investigation. First, a description of the highlighted concept as it is formulated by each of the authors. Second, a discussion about the relationship between the two topics or concepts. Third, a description of the way this articulation sheds light on each of them and, based on this, on the respective reflections in which they find themselves. Fourth, an attempt at finding an “equilibrium” or “balance” between the singularity of each work and its possible openness by way of this articulation. Fifth, the configuration of a new image of the history of philosophy to which these philosophies belong.

In fact, the fifth item is the broader horizon that frames Wamback’s discussion (5). She is not interested in creating a common narrative thread that would encompass both philosophers’ work—indeed, such a common thread may not even exist. Rather, by doing justice to the way each author relates to other thinkers, she intends to “anchor” the “resonances in their work to the history of philosophy”, thereby formulating an “alternative image of the philosophical alliances in French academia over the last two centuries” (5). Here the most ambitious facet of the project is revealed, namely to go beyond a book directed to a specialist audience by retracing kindred context or horizons, thus making explicit the way philosophy is built as a series of answers to the great questions posed by other philosophers (5). This implies the recognition of a historical dimension that is not exclusively factual—if it were possible to think of it in this way—, intrinsic to a specific philosophical debate, perhaps (in a first moment) even in a latent way, but which would even so still be affirmed in each of them. As Merleau-Ponty wrote in the fifties, this would be a kind of subterranean or indirect history, a history that is expressed in the facts without being reducible to them and without detaching itself from them.

In this sense, according to Wamback, the question about thought and being, which is as ancient as our most ancient sources on Western thought, is revealed as a privileged problematization axis, allowing her to trace out the way Merleau-Ponty and Deleuze pursue this classic problem in their respective philosophical reflections on the basis of their network of references and their theoretical frameworks. She is, therefore, able to uncover deeper and broader debates than those one would glean from a first reading, or even a reading that pays more attention to the schools and neglects the “secret” historicity that animates them. This is undoubtedly one of the most interesting aspects of Wamback’s work.

The book is organized around five main cores. I will first describe those cores in a general way, and then I will offer a more detailed analysis of each of them, following the way Wamback builds her argument.

The text is divided into seven chapters, each of which is further divided into topics. These chapters all follow a general methodology: first Wamback presents the position of one of the philosophers being analyzed, then the position of the other, and finally compares them. This methodological option greatly contributes to the clarity of the text and to the strength of her argumentation.

The first and the second chapters focus, according to Wamback herself, in a more direct discussion between the two authors. The idea is not to pit one against the other but to discuss the way each of them approaches similar questions in a kind of textual confrontation, one that is more intimately connected to the analysis of specific works and texts.

The first chapter is dedicated to the topic of thought, focusing on what Wamback describes as “original thought”, seeking to formulate what are, for each author, its nature and conditions. The main axis of the chapter is the argument that both authors think this notion as a way of distancing themselves from the representation model and its implications. This move demands an analysis of the objective and subjective dimensions that constitute this “original thought”, which leads us to the problem of the ontology therein implicit. This question is pursued in the second chapter, which seeks to understand in what sense the way both authors formulate the question about the status of thought—and its distance from the representation model—is grounded in an understanding of being. In particular, Wamback shows how this ontology recognizes being as unitary, even if it admits—indeed, demands—difference and indetermination.

The third chapter focuses on what Wamback considers a kind of epistemological or ontological “project” or even “decision” present in Merleau-Ponty and Deleuze’s philosophies, discussing the extent to which their paths (delineated by the first two chapters) are connected to an understanding of the sense of philosophical work, especially in the framing of its own field of investigation—which is connected to what Wamback describes as the “empirical”. She will here follow the way Merleau-Ponty and Deleuze absorb the much-debated “transcendental empiricism”, tracing out their divergences from Husserl and Kant. This absorption is, to Wamback, one of the main points of proximity between the two, a point to which I will return below.

This investigation is carried a step further by its incursion into the relationship between the condition and the conditioned, an examination that will be carried out in the fourth chapter, with its reference to Bergson. As is well known, the relation between Deleuze and Bergson is much more explicit than the relation between Merleau-Ponty and Bergson. However, more and more recent scholars have highlighted this last relation, and Wamback’s work is part of this recent trend in the scholarship, which presents a broad yet still unexplored horizon. In particular, Wamback’s reference to Bergson appears as a central element—both for Merleau-Ponty and Deleuze—in the understanding of the relation between the condition and the conditioned, especially in connection to the notion of “simultaneity”.

Chapters five and six focus then on this relation, particularly in its connection to the question of “expression”, a question central to both Merleau-Ponty and Deleuze and which is organized precisely around the articulation between the “ground” and the grounded. To understand this question, the fifth chapter is dedicated to the description of its connection to literary experience—examining the reference to Proust, which is common to both and which is of undeniable relevance—, and the sixth chapter is dedicated to its connection to visual dimension—examining the also common and very important reference to Cézanne.

The seventh chapter also has recourse to a common denominator but now approaching the discussion from a different angle. According to Wamback, the previous chapters had as their goal to show, in different ways, the proximity between the two philosophers, by exploring how their common horizon is structured by the assertion of a unity between the condition and the conditioned, an inseparability of the ground and the grounded—a logic that is particularly notable in the notion of expression. The last chapter then attempts to shed new light on this logic, highlighting the way in which a differential dynamic operates inside this logic. The common denominator mentioned above is Saussure.

Wamback uses this reference to Saussure to explain how a “solid immanence requires a differential theory of how the condition generates the conditioned (which nevertheless determines it)” (7). She shows how this differential dynamic is to be found in both authors, especially in the way each of them appropriates Saussure’s thought, and how its constituting logic is marked by a tension between the condition and the conditioned.

Finally, the conclusion seeks to discuss the resonances and the divergences between the two philosophers, taking a stand on whether it is possible to establish a common horizon to them, or whether their distance from each other is so great that there would be no effective dialogue or convergence.

This finishes the general presentation of the book. Before continuing, it is still worth noting an important methodological option defended by Wamback, one responsible for the tight circumscription of her project. It is the option of not analyzing the relation between the two authors in terms of the notion of perception. According to her, the way each philosopher situates this notion is extremely different. In the case of Merleau-Ponty, the description of perception is carried out in an ontological or “epistemological” horizon, whereas Deleuze would think it as connected to an ethical discussion, conceived according to relations of force intensity. Such an observation is also helpful in understanding Wamback’s second methodological choice, which is connected to her first: the works on which she focuses. In Merleau-Ponty’s case, Wamback focuses primarily on The Visible and the Invisible, since—according to a widespread reading—his ontology would be the most developed at that point in his career. This would justify relegating The Phenomenology of Perception to the sidelines, since this work is considered by this line of interpretation to be “propaedeutic” to the ontology of his last work.

With this counterpoint as the horizon, it is possible to highlight the relevance and the originality of Wamback’s proposed framing, especially her option of discussing both authors from the point of view of their understanding of the status of thought. This point of view is the starting point of her proposed approximation and of her discussions, presenting an unusual take when considered against the backdrop of the most common studies about this relationship. Moreover, as I will discuss in the next section, this point of view culminates in a discussion about the sense that the “transcendental project” assumes in each philosopher. Wamback rests her argument especially in the recognition of “immanence” as an irresistible dimension, turning the articulation between the condition and the conditioned, between the ground and the grounded, into a central element in each author’s formulations. Let us, therefore, see in more detail how she builds her analysis.

III. The Book

Wamback bases her reading on the idea that there is, from the beginning, something in common to Deleuze and Merleau-Ponty: not only the fact that both reflected on the topic of thought but also the fact that they distinguished two types of thought. On the one hand, a properly original thought, and, on the other hand, a thought without any originality or expressiveness. The second type of thought is merely an application of given concepts, whereas the first type—which is the type that really intrigues the two philosophers—is a kind of “creative” dynamic. Recalling the distinction made by Merleau-Ponty between “speaking speech” and “spoken speech”, as well as the distinction between “thought” and “knowledge” as described by Deleuze, Wamback proposes a peculiar framework, extremely revealing of her reading: the distinction between a “thinking thought” and an expressive thought. “Thinking thought” is the type of thought which is central to both authors and which is the starting point of Wamback’s investigation, demanding an understanding of the way each author conceives of it. The first piece of evidence highlighted by Wamback is the way this notion figures in both as a refusal of the modern conception of “representation”.

Starting with Merleau-Ponty’s reflection, Wamback appeals to some of the central notions of the Phenomenology of Perception to circumscribe his notion of thought. She then briefly examines the way Merleau-Ponty understands the sense of perception, with special emphasis on his criticism of the intellectualist and empiricist theories and on his notion of “field”, showing how the perceptual dynamic is grounded on the “original intertwinement of body and world” (18). From this point on, the question becomes whether his notion of thought is grounded in the same articulation, being always in relation to something. To pursue this question, Wamback examines the notions of the cogito—especially its negative dimension—, of geometrical thought, and of linguistic expression.

At this point in her analysis, Wamback introduces the notion of Fundierung, proposed in the Phenomenology of Perception as a “two-way relation”, an alternative to the classical understanding of the ground and the grounded as sundered elements, since they are now defined as relational dimensions in reciprocal determination. While this is a central notion in Merleau-Ponty’s work, Wamback uses it here only to think the relation between “thought” and “language”. She defends that, in spite of all its implications, there is still in this notion an asymmetry: the expressed still has “ontological priority” (35), preserving a difference between the terms. On her reading, this asymmetry would only be dissolved later, with Merleau-Ponty’s introduction of the notion of “institution”. Nevertheless, Wamback highlights that the Fundierung relation already contained a central idea, namely “excess” as an indication of the “immanence of the ground that transcends itself in the expression” (26). Her conclusion is that, for Merleau-Ponty, thought is not a “mediating activity”, but is, rather, “familiar with the world”, “it has direct contact” with it and is “in a certain sense shaped by it” (30).

Wamback shows that something similar takes place in Deleuze’s thought. From the beginning, Deleuze proposes to understand thought by confronting the sign, refusing the idea of a natural inclination to the truth, and recognizing it as always characterized by “the singularity of the meeting”, in which signs appear as “enigmas” (31). Here, more than with Merleau-Ponty, the spotlight falls on the differential character of sign and sense. Wamback shows how these notions are thought of in order to move away from the most characteristic presuppositions of representational thought: on the one hand, the idea of identity and unity, and, on the other hand, the notions of nature and of affinity with the truth. Deleuze recognizes, under the eight postulates of representational thought, a “confusion of empirical and transcendental features” (47) that obscures the proper sense of thought.

Wamback proposes that, in this perspective, Merleau-Ponty and Deleuze are extremely close, meeting in this movement that she describes as a “transcendental examination of thought”(49), a discussion about its conditions and about the human capacity to think. One consequence of this proximity is that both authors recognize that the object of thought is characterized by a “certain exteriority” (50). This means that both authors recognize—and hold it in high esteem—the “grounded” dimension of thought, focusing on the description of the relation between the ground and the grounded as intrinsic or immanent (51). It is precisely this intrinsic or immanent relation that guarantees its creative genesis: “In sum, for both authors, the creative nature of thought is due to the necessary role of thought in the grounding relation”  (51).

After examining these conditions for the investigation of thought in each author—and the presence of a certain undeniable immanence—, Wamback focuses on describing their respective ontologies. As mentioned above, she holds that the way they understand thought, particularly their conception of thought as sustained by this intertwinement of immanence and transcendence, demands a description of the ontological ground therein implicit.

In Merleau-Ponty’s case, as described in the Introduction, Wamback focuses on the ontology of his last texts, notably The Visible and the Invisible. She emphasizes there the differential character that is central in his formulation, particularly through his notion of flesh—described by him in its originally dissonant and, simultaneously, unitary character (58), from which Wamback detaches the notion of “style” or “typicality” (59). She insists that it is not a matter of identity, but of a differential unity, which is connected to the notions of openness and constitution.

In Deleuze’s case, on the other hand, Wamback defends that the same dimensions present in Merleau-Ponty’s proposition can be found in the former’s ontology. The two authors supplant the distinction between the abstract and the concrete by reporting being to another level, which, in the case of Deleuze, is thought of as the virtual: like Merleau-Ponty’s flesh, the virtual is characterized by a nonidentical unity that cannot be divided into an inside and an outside; also like the flesh, the virtual is characterized by a fundamental openness, being also the condition of concrete things (65).

On the other hand, concerning the differences between them, Wamback holds that Deleuze devoted more time to the task of showing that unity and difference are not in opposition, that indetermination does not imply undifferentiation and that the constitutive nature of the virtual does not detach it from the things and concepts that are conditioned by it (65). In spite of this difference, she concludes that, for both, the object of thought—the flesh and the virtual—is not an identity: “The flesh and the virtual are disguised (VI, 150; DR, 133), displaced with respect to themselves” (79). The two notions combine unity and difference, acting as the condition of concepts and things, be they living or non-living (80). These dimensions are responsible for the individuation and crystallization processes, situated in the articulation between, on the one hand, the visible and the actual, and, on the other hand, the virtual and the invisible flesh, acting in the region between conservation and creation.

Supported by this discussion about the two philosophers’ ontologies—in their closeness and in their distance—, Wamback proceeds to study that which she describes as their “transcendental project”, seeking to situate their proposed investigation about the nature of thought in a broader framework:

“What is at stake, philosophically, when they refuse a representational account of thought, and prefer instead to situate the origin of thinking not in the thinking subject, but in the encounter with an exterior sign (Deleuze), or in the participation in a wild being (Merleau-Ponty)? Why do they both attack the representational account of thought?” (85).

She defends that they are brought close together by their affirmation of the non-exteriority between subject and object, between the one who thinks and what is thought—an affirmation that, according to her, is at the basis of what the two of them recognize as philosophically being “immanence” (85). Wamback defends that immanence is articulated with the idea of “difference”, even with all the distance that separates their respective ontologies.

Deleuze’s transcendental project is carefully presented by a confrontation with the Kantian project and by a discussion of a series of thinkers that heavily influenced him, especially Spinoza, Maimon, Leibniz, and Husserl. Merleau-Ponty’s project, in its turn, is presented through its confrontation with Husserl and, more generally speaking, with phenomenology, a relation characterized simultaneously by connection and distance. Wamback highlights that, beyond their idiosyncrasies, they have a common inspiration in their criticism of Husserl and his proposal of a return “to the things themselves”:

“A transcendental philosophy should look not for the conditions of possibility of experience but for its conditions of reality. For Merleau-Ponty as much as for Deleuze, this implies that the transcendental ground is to be situated in the empirical. The ground must be immanent to the grounded and thus possess a certain historicity that cannot be reconciled with the invariability of transcendent essences. Philosophy’s task, then, is defined as the explanation of how the empirical, the grounded, can be produced immanently. For both thinkers, philosophy is to be a philosophy of genesis.” (121)

There is also a resonance in what they reject from Husserl, especially his notion of a transcendental subject (122). According to Wamback, they both see in this notion an obstacle to a consistent transcendental project, since it prevents it from “becoming an immanent ontology” (123) and weakens its differential dimension.

After this more general perspective, it is now possible to return to what Wamback calls the dimension of “immanence”, present in the two authors’ respective transcendental project. To analyze this notion, it is worthwhile to focus especially on its differential dynamic—something that Wamback has worked on from the beginning by way of the relation between the ground and the grounded, the main axis that articulates her analyses.

Here one should mention a central element both for the two philosophers and for Wamback’s argument, namely the notion of expression, precisely as a way of understanding this articulation between the condition and the conditioned. The following chapters focus, each in their own way, on this notion, circumscribing it through diverse and correlate points of view: through its relation to the notion of simultaneity, through its connection to literary expression, and, finally, by discussing its visual dimension. In a word: by their relations to Bergson, Proust, and Cézanne.

The first step is their common reference to Bergson, which is circumscribed by Wamback through the notion of simultaneity. She seeks to understand how the appeal to Bergson helps Merleau-Ponty and Deleuze to build, each in their own way, a transcendental project that attempts to situate the transcendental in the empirical, the basis for what she considers the “philosophy of immanence” that is characteristic of both (125).

Wamback argues that Merleau-Ponty’s initial reading of Bergson, particularly in the Phenomenology of Perception, is “essentially unfair” (132), since he accuses Bergson of “not considering other kinds of spatiality in order to think time” (ibid). This diagnosis would be partially revised in The Visible and the Invisible, especially through the notion of “partial coincidence” and through his discussion of depth—both topics that are also to be found in Deleuze’s reading. Here the two meet each other again, since the two of them recognize depth not as a spatial but as a temporal dimension, connected to the idea of simultaneity—explicitly as a refusal of a notion of succession, recognizing the present as a “contraction of the past” (142). This formulation would lead them to similar consequences, especially the affirmation of an impossibility of directly accessing the past.

“These ressonances between Merleau-Ponty’s and Deleuze’s references to Bergson also reveals resonances at the most general level of their conception of the relation between the ground and the grounded. Both appeal to Bergson’s idea that the passing of time must be explained through the simultaneity of future, present, and past, because that offers a possible solution if your goal is to avoid referring, in the explanation, to an exterior or transcendent element. In other words, Bergson’s notion of simultaneity is a very good illustration of how one can keep the relation between the ground and the grounded immanent.” (143)

Wamback emphasizes the notion of simultaneity as a central element in their philosophies, a kind of “field” that articulates transcendence and immanence. The study about expression—about the way this relationship is realized and is inscribed in their respective transcendental projects—continues through an analysis of Proust and Cézanne.

The careful chapter devoted to Proust shows, on the one hand, that both Merleau-Ponty and Deleuze find in the writer inspiration to understand an achronological, original time, composed of dimensions and not divided into successive moments, configured around a “centre of envelopment” (163). On the other hand, Wamback sustains that their respective readings diverge to the extent that, beyond this direct reference to time, Proust also contributed to Merleau-Ponty’s reflections on the body, something that did not occur with Deleuze.

The following chapter continues the discussion about the notion of expression, focusing now on its visual dimension and finding support in Cézanne’s presence, also common to the two philosophers. Wamback shows how both Merleau-Ponty and Deleuze insist on the nonrepresentational character of art, which leads them both in the direction of a “nonimitative resemblance” (170). The guiding thread is the understanding—that brings them very close to each other—of the painting process and its nature (178).

Finally, the seventh chapter is devoted to a description of how Saussure figures in each author’s work. In the previous chapters, recall, Wamback strove to make explicit the way they tried to “ensure the immanence of their transcendental projects by characterizing the relationship between the ground and the grounded as one of simultaneity (chapter 4) and expression (chapters 5 and 6)” (189). Now, in the last chapter, she explores another central element of these transcendental projects, namely the idea of difference. Wamback argues that, in spite of some differences, both Merleau-Ponty and Deleuze are interested in the same ideas from Saussure, especially “his discovery of the genetic power of difference” (211).

After briefly retracing Wamback’s path, it is now possible to summarize, in a few lines, her main proposal. It seems to me that the central—and strongest—of her claims is her proposal of a convergence between the transcendental projects of Merleau-Ponty and Deleuze, especially due to the intrinsic relation between such projects and the field of immanence. According to Wamback, this immanence is an original articulation between the condition and the conditioned, formulated by the two authors through the notions of simultaneity and expression. Such a “philosophy of immanence” is on the horizon thanks to which a new sense of the transcendental could appear, bring the philosophers close together.

Such a similarity, however, does not erase their differences. Indeed, it illuminates these differences from a new perspective. This is what allows Wamback to finally conclude, without losing sight of their respective singularities, that there is still a “unity” among them, as a new horizon that does not reject dissonance, putting it into a new context and proposing it a new meaning. As she had proposed in the beginning, one of the main goals of her project was to retrace philosophical relations, to rethink more subterranean contexts, to reconfigure lines of influence and of exchange in a more general sense.

It is, therefore, a highly original proposal, resulting in an uncommon work among the current scholarship, one that is pursued with admirable care, clarity, and cohesion.

Alexander Schnell: Ce este fenomenul?, Ratio & Revelatio, 2019

Ce este fenomenul? Book Cover Ce este fenomenul?
Epoché
Alexander Schnell. Translated by Remus Breazu
Ratio & Revelatio
2019
Paperback 7,00 €
120

Alexander Schnell: Wirklichkeitsbilder

Wirklichkeitsbilder Book Cover Wirklichkeitsbilder
Philosophische Untersuchungen 40
Alexander Schnell
Mohr Siebeck
2015
Paperback 54,00 €
XII, 223

Reviewed by: Fabian Erhardt (Bergische Universität Wuppertal)

Zu Beginn des 21. Jahrhunderts haben zahlreiche Impulse der Phänomenologie in Theorien des Bewusstseins, der Kognition, der Emotion und der sozialen Koexistenz Einzug gehalten. Husserls explizites Programm, wonach Phänomenologie transzendentale Philosophie sei, erfährt meist eine tendenziell „stiefmütterliche“ Behandlung. So lange die Phänomenologie dank ihrer leistungsfähigen Deskriptionen zu einer präziseren Stilisierung unserer epistemischen Ausgangslage und ihrer Implikationen beiträgt, sehen auch „naturalistische“ Verwender ihres begrifflichen organon großzügig über ihre „idealistischen“ Vermessenheiten hinweg. Doch die Zeit einer Marginalisierung ihres erkenntnislegitimierenden Anspruchs scheint vorbei – das „Transzendentale“ ist wieder ein aktuelles Diskussionsthema in der Phänomenologie, das „spekulative Format der Philosophie“ noch nicht überall zugunsten einer „Sensibilität für sanfte commitments“ (Wolfram Hogrebe) oder reiner „Archäologien von Sinn- und Seinsverständnissen“ (Sophie Loidolt) verabschiedet. Statt wie zahlreiche PhänomenologInnen Zugeständnisse an die Kritiker der transzendentalen Ausrichtung der Phänomenologie zu machen, wählt Alexander Schnell zur Vorstellung seiner „generativen Phänomenologie“ eine offensive wie eigenständige Strategie: Gerade die Radikalisierung ihres transzendentalen Anspruchs am Leitfaden einer konsequenten Kritik der Allgemeingültigkeit der Aktintentionalität soll im Kontext gegenwärtiger Philosophie-Diskurse ihre argumentativen Ressourcen verdeutlichen.

Wie also „die Welt als konstituierten Sinn konkret verständlich zu machen“ (Hua I, 164)? Ausgangspunkt des Ansatzes ist eine doppelte Perspektivierung des Phänomenbegriffs. Gewöhnlich adressiert Husserl das Phänomen als „das reine Erleben als Tatsache“ (Hua XXXV, 77), also als das Faktum des Erscheinens von Gegebenheiten für das Bewusstsein, samt deren reflexiv aufweisbaren Implikationen (Abschattung, Apperzeption, Protention, Retention, Auffassung/Auffassungsinhalt, etc.). Er stößt aber – vor allem in den Manuskripten zum inneren Zeitbewusstsein und zur passiven Synthesis – auf „Tatsachen […], die sich nicht in einem anschaulichen konstitutiven Prozess aufzeigen lassen“ (5). Solche „Grenzfakten“ verweisen auf „fungierende Leistungen“, welche das Erscheinen von etwas im Bezugsrahmen einer intentionalen Korrelation aber überhaupt erst ermöglichen, und sich somit als Phänomen sui generis melden – ohne sich durch die „Positivität“ eines „in ihm“ Erscheinenden ontologisch zu stabilisieren. Beispiel: Wird ein Ton in der Perspektive des ersten Phänomenbegriffs als Zeitobjekt deskriptiv analysiert, können beispielsweise „Retention“ und „Urimpression“ als präreflexive Implikationen der Konstitution eben dieses Tons aufgewiesen werden. Der zweite Phänomenbegriff verschiebt den Fokus auf die Konstitution der Zeitlichkeit der Retention selbst: Ist diese „objektiv“ oder „subjektiv, „beides“, oder „weder noch“? Wie kann ein deskriptiv-anschaulich nicht weiter Erschließbares dennoch transzendentalphänomenologisch fundiert und ausgewiesen werden? Hier verstrickt sich die deskriptive Analyse in Antinomien, welchen Schnell zufolge nur durch eine „konstruktiv“ erweiterte Methodologie beizukommen ist, mit der sich Zugang zu den ursprünglich konstituierenden Phänomenen gewinnen lässt. Denn: Es „muss mit aller Schärfe betont werden, dass das Feld des Transzendentalen sich nicht auf das in einer anschaulichen Evidenz Gegebene reduzieren lässt“ (5). Ansonsten bleibt transzendentales Philosophieren auch in seinem phänomenologischen Vollzug in einen vitiösen Zirkel gesperrt, da das Zu-Legitimierende – das im Rahmen einer intentionalen Beziehung zwischen einer „subjektiven“ und einer „objektiven“ Instanz Erscheinende – seinerseits als Legitimationsgrundlage veranschlagt wird.

Mit dieser Einsicht einer notwendigen „»Heterogenität« zwischen Bedingendem und Bedingten“ (42) hebt die generative Phänomenologie an; sie stellt sich im Grunde als Versuch dar, diese Heterogenität zwischen Weisen der Gegebenheit und der Nicht-Gegebenheit methodisch zu operationalisieren. Dementsprechend bezeichnet „Generativität“ das „Hervorkommen und Aufbrechen eines Sinnüberschusses jenseits und diesseits des phänomenologisch Beschreibbaren“ (1). Für die „Wirklichkeitsbilder“ ist dabei „diesseits“ die leitende Präposition: Als ein transzendentalphilosophisch in Anspruch nehmbares „Diesseits“ der bipolaren Dichotomien wie Subjekt/Objekt oder Bewusstsein/Welt soll sich hier die Grunddimension enthüllen, welche die „Genesis des Sinns“ (1) erzeugt und selbigen als „Spielraum“ (5) jedes intentionalen Bezogensein-Könnens konstituiert. Eine solche Genesis kann nicht als „Vermögen“ eines „präexistierenden Subjekts“ (4) angesetzt werden – zur Disposition steht nicht die Sinngebung eines Bewusstseins, sondern die Sinnbildung selbst. Folgerichtig stellt auch nicht das „Subjekt“ den „Ausgangspunkt“ des vorgelegten phänomenologischen Verfahrens dar, sondern „die so unaufhörliche wie rätselhafte Erzeugung und Bildung des »Sinns«“ (82). Zwar weist diese eine „subjektive“ Dimension auf, doch um die „Kohärenz eines »sich bildenden Sinns«“ nachzuvollziehen, bedarf es der Thematisierung einer reflexiven und pulsierenden Architektur, in der „ideale“ (auf subjektive Aktivität rückführbare) und „reale“ (aus der objektiven Äußerlichkeit hervorgehende) Elemente sich als „gleichsam organisches Netzwerk von »Fungierungen«, »Leistungen« und […] »Begriffen«“ (83) manifestieren. Auf dieser genuin transzendentalen, weil für die Sinnbildung letztkonstitutiven Stufe ist das Objekt nie „reines“ Objekt, das Subjekt nie „reines“ Subjekt – deren architektonischer Einheit, nicht deren intentionalem Gegenübersein „entspringt“ Sinn. Damit kommt ein „präimmanentes“, wechselseitiges Vermittlungsverhältnis ins Spiel, in welchem sich die intentionale Korrelation in actu ausdifferenziert: Nicht als „ein Hin-und-Her zwischen zwei bloß formal herausgebildeten Polen“ (197), sondern als „»anonyme« Genesis des »sich bildenden Sinns«“ (83). Diese ereignet sich in einer „nicht aufzuhebenden Spannung“ (206) zwischen einer „subjektiven“ und einer „objektiven“ Instanz – und damit „diesseits“ dieser Unterscheidung.

Von zentraler methodologischer Bedeutung sind nun „die jedem Sinnphänomen innewohnenden genetisch-imaginativen Prozesse“ (2). Diese gehen „konstitutiv jeglicher realen und faktischen Fixierung“ (18) voraus und ermöglichen, dass Sinn sich als der Spielraum der Weltoffenheit je schon schematisiert hat; ein Spielraum wohlgemerkt, den „jede objektivierende Wahrnehmung“, ja „jedes objektivierende Bewusstsein überhaupt“ (43), voraussetzt: „Diese »Selbst-Schematisierung« ist das eigentliche und ureigene Werk der Einbildungskraft […].“ (196) Als terminus technicus der generativen Phänomenologie bezeichnet die Einbildungskraft nicht ein subjektives Vermögen, sondern ein transzendentales „Verfahren zur Darstellung des Wirklichen“ (64), welches unablässig die Horizonte möglicher Gegenstandsbezüge des intentionalen Bewusstseins dadurch generiert, dass es „sowohl de[m] Überschuss des »Wirklichen« gegenüber dem »Bewussten« als auch de[m] Überschuss des »Erlebens« gegenüber dem »Objektivieren«“ (64) Rechnung trägt. Das Bild ist die Art und Weise, „wie diese Darstellung sich konkret vollzieht“ (64), da in ihm „Ich“ und „Nicht-Ich“ in ein „innerliches“, produktives Verhältnis gebracht und gehalten werden. Schnell bezeichnet diesen Umstand als eine durch die Einbildungskraft geleistete „Endoexogenisierung“ (26) des phänomenalen Feldes, eine Figur der Subjektivität, die an Heideggers Begriff des „ausstehenden Innestehens“ anknüpft. In ihr zeigt sich die nie zu fixierende „»Zweideutigkeit« zwischen einem »anonymen« und einem bestimmten »subjektiven« Charakter“ der Sinnbildung, eine „Doppelbewegung“ des „Schwebens“ oder „Schwingens“ „zwischen einer »endogenen« (Immanenz, Innestehen) und einer »exogenen« Dimension (Transzendenz, Ausstehen)“ (206).

Zur Untersuchung der „Regeln und Gesetzmäßigkeiten“ (89) der Genesis des Sinns entwickelt Schnell die „phänomenologische Konstruktion“ als „methodologische[n] Grundbegriff der neu zu gründenden transzendentalen Phänomenologie“ (37). Mit ihrer Hilfe soll „jegliche Faktualität in Bewegung“ versetzt werden können, „erzittern“ (6), um Zugang zu einer Konstitutionsstufe „diesseits des »Gegebenen« und des »Wahrgenommenen«“ (2) zu eröffnen. Die phänomenologische Konstruktion ist dabei eine „»generative« Verfahrensweise“ (5) – genauer: deren drei –, welche die „»bildenden« Prozesse“ zu Tage fördert, die dem „Haben“ eines „Realen“ oder eines „Gegebenen“ vor jeder faktischen „Absetzung“ zugrunde liegen. Als „Entwurf“ unternimmt eine phänomenologische Konstruktion den Versuch, die – phänomenologisch aufgefassten – transzendentalen Bedingungen des vom Phänomen Geforderten zu genetisieren. Die Ausgangspunkte phänomenologischer Konstruktionen sind die Endpunkte der deskriptiven Analyse. In einer Art (generativer) »phänomenologischer Zickzack-Bewegung«“ (38) suchen sie zwischen den „deskriptiv nicht weiter erklärbaren Phänomenen und eben dem zu Konstruierenden hin und her“ (150) zu „schwingen“. So soll das „wechselseitige Bedingungsverhältnis von Genesis und Faktualität“ (107) in eine Erfahrung transponiert werden. Diese weist eine transzendentale Struktur auf, dergestalt, dass sie sich als Ermöglichung der Möglichkeit des Ausgangspunktes realisiert. Ontologisch handelt es sich bei dem Zu-Konstruierenden weder um ein im Voraus Gegebenes, noch um eine allererst Hervorzubringendes, sondern um etwas, das einem anderen „architektonischen Register“ als dem intuitiv Individuierbaren, schon Konstituierten angehört, und der Unterscheidung zwischen Erkenntnistheorie und Ontologie vorausliegt. Mit dem Erfassen des Status dieser Methode steht und fällt das Vorhaben der „Wirklichkeitsbilder“: Ihrer Darstellung und Exemplifikation ist der in zehn Kapitel gegliederte Text im Wesentlichen gewidmet. Während die ersten drei Kapitel – „Einleitung“, „Phänomen und Konstruktion“, „Die Einbildungskraft“ – eine ideengeschichtliche Verortung sowie eine systematische Grundlegung der methodologischen Optionen leisten, „erproben“ die sechs folgenden Kapitel – „Das phänomenologische Unbewusste“, „Die Realität“, „Die Wahrheit“, „Die Zeit“, „Der Raum“ und „Der Mensch“ – das phänomenologische Konstruieren in Einzelanalysen. Hierbei werden jeweils phänomenologische Konstruktionen „vorgeführt“: Zwei nicht aufeinander reduzierbare, aber unverzichtbare epistemische Zugänge zum jeweiligen Thema werden phänomenologisch-konstruktiv um eine generative Grunddimension erweitert, die als Ermöglichung ebendieser Zugänge einsichtig wird. Das letzte Kapitel ist einer abschließenden wie ausblickenden Reflexion der Perspektiven gewidmet, die sich im Rahmen einer generativen Phänomenologie eröffnen.

Im ersten Kapitel wird dargelegt, weshalb sich die generative Phänomenologie jedem Versuch entgegenstellt – Schnell referiert als zeitgenössische Beispiele die Theorien von Claude Romano und Jocelyn Benoist –, „den Sinn in einem vorausgesetzten Realen“ (19) zu verankern. Vielmehr gilt es, die „Möglichkeit der Notwendigkeit“ (20) eines sich als real Darstellenden zu „be- und hinterfragen“ (20). Damit gerät die Aufgabe in den Blick, „die Notwendigkeit auf ihre eigene Notwendigkeit hin zu untersuchen“ (20): Die Frage ist nicht, wie sich ein sowieso notwendig Reales phänomenal bekundet, sondern wie sich die Notwendigkeit eines hypothetisch Realen phänomenalisiert. Sobald eine subjektivierte oder objektivierte „Fundierung“ der Notwendigkeit des Realen in Anspruch genommen wird – ob anschaulich beschreibbar, ob logisch oder spekulativ deduzierbar –, ist diese genuin phänomenologische Aufgabe übersprungen und der Begriff der Realität – konträr zu den Ambitionen jedes „Realismus“ – um seine Sachhaltigkeit gebracht. Um dem zu entgehen, bedarf es „jede einseitig ontologisch oder erkenntnistheoretisch ausgerichtete Verfahrensweise aufzugeben“ (22). Vielmehr erfordert das Programm der generativen Phänomenologie die Auseinandersetzung mit konkreten phänomenalen Gehalten, um „»eine transzendentale Erfahrung herauszustellen« und vor allem ein transzendentales Feld zu begründen, das diesseits jeder »anschaulichen« Erfahrung angesiedelt“ (24) und imstande ist, eine einem jeweiligen phänomenalen Gehalt angemessene „Fundierung ohne Fundament“ (22) zu leisten. Die Erschließung dieses „»anonyme[n]«, »präimmanente[n]«, »präphänomenale[n]« Feld[es]“ (26) verlangt Schnell zufolge eben jene „phänomenologischen Konstruktionen“, die er im Rahmen des generativen Ansatzes mithilfe der Feinabstimmung eines „spekulativen Transzendentalismus“ und einer „konstruktiven Phänomenologie“ zu entwickeln sucht.

Das zweite Kapitel befasst sich mit den phänomen- und erkenntnistheoretischen Grundlagen der konstruktiven Methodologie. Leitend ist dabei ein „Phänomenalitäts“-Typus, der „diesseits der reinen Gegebenheit in der immanenten Sphäre des transzendentalen Bewusstseins zu verorten ist“ (30). Als Pointe von im Detail doch sehr unterschiedlichen Ansätzen – Husserl, Heidegger, Kant – destilliert Schnell, dass es ein Phänomenalitäts-ermöglichendes Nicht-Erscheinen im Phänomen selbst gibt, von dem her sich das Phänomen überhaupt erst als Phänomen und nicht lediglich als unmittelbares Erscheinen eines objektivierten Seienden thematisieren lässt. Hier erweist sich die genuin „transzendentale Dimension des Phänomens innerhalb der Phänomenalität“: Es handelt sich dabei um jene „dynamische Dimension des Erscheinens, die sich nicht auf einen stabilen ontologischen Grund stützen kann“ (32) – nicht einmal auf eine fixe zeitliche Bestimmung –, und selbst nie als „Seinspositivität“ gegeben ist. Diese als „generativ“ ausgezeichnete Dimension in der „präimmanenten Sphäre des Bewusstseins“ (37) bietet Schnell zufolge die „Möglichkeit der Legitimierung des Sinns des Erscheindenden“ (37), ohne das transzendentale Bedingungsverhältnis qua Homogenisierung von Bedingendem und Bedingtem in einem vitiösen Zirkel zu de-plausibilisieren. Hierzu werden drei Gattungen phänomenologischer Konstruktion konzipiert. Phänomenologische Konstruktionen erster Gattung beziehen sich als „Genetisierung“ von Tatsachen auf einen präzisen Gegenstandsbereich, der auf der Ebene der immanenten Bewusstseinssphäre widersprüchliche „Fakta“ zeitigt, deren mögliche vorgängige Einheit in der präimmanenten Bewusstseinssphäre qua Konstruktion konkret ausweisbar ist. Die phänomenologische Konstruktion zweiter Gattung entspinnt sich zwischen „dem sich in der immanenten Bewusstseinssphäre darstellenden Phänomen“ (39) und dem virtuellen Horizont seiner Phänomenalisierung. Ihren Fokus bildet somit das „Aufbrechen der Genesis“ als Wechselspiel zwischen Vernichtung und bildendem Erzeugen, das als einheitliches Prinzip der Phänomenalisierung die Differenz zwischen Erscheinen und Erscheinendem konkretisiert. Eine phänomenologische Konstruktion dritter Gattung zielt auf die „ermöglichende Verdopplung“ (40) seines transzendentalen Bedingungsverhältnisses, also auf das Möglichmachen der Möglichkeit selbst. Damit realisiert sie die Einsicht, dass auf der transzendentalen Stufe der letztursprünglichen Konstitution des Sinnes des Erscheinenden die bedingende Möglichkeit sich selbst in ihrem Vermögen erscheint, das, was möglich macht, ihrerseits möglich zu machen.

Schnell exemplifiziert diese Bestimmungen im Entwurf einer generativen „Phänomenologie der Erkenntnis“. Erkenntnis als Erkenntnis ist nicht an einen bestimmten Gegenstand gebunden; zudem ist Erkenntnis nie thematisch und explizit gegeben, erscheint also nicht zusätzlich zu dem Wie des Gegebenseins eines phänomenalen Gehalts in der immanenten Bewusstseinssphäre. Damit stellt die Erkenntnis den Prototyp eines „unscheinbaren“ Phänomens dar, dessen spezifischer Phänomenalitäts-Typus sich nun qua phänomenologischer Konstruktion dritter Gattung ausweisen soll. Zuerst bilden wir uns einen „noch völlig leeren Begriff“ (43) dessen, was eine Erkenntnis als Erkenntnis auszeichnet. Unabhängig davon, wie viel inhaltliche Konkretisierung wir diesem Begriff beilegen, kommt er nicht umhin, sich als „bloße Vorstellung“ (43) zu reflektieren, nicht als tatsächliche Auszeichnung der Erkenntnis als Erkenntnis, sondern als ein „ihr gegenüberstehender Begriff davon“ (43). Um zur Auszeichnung selbst zu gelangen, muss das soeben Entworfene vernichtet werden. Es stellt sich also parallel zu jeder bloß projizierten Vorstellung ein „reflexives Verfahren“ (44) ein, das Schnell als genetischen Prozess von Erzeugung und Vernichtung bezeichnet. Anders formuliert: Im Auseinandertreten von angepeilter Auszeichnung der Erkenntnis als Erkenntnis und bloßer Vorstellung reflektiert sich die intentionale Struktur des Bewusstseins selbst. Diese Autoreflexion der Bewusstseinskorrelation ist nun genau in dem Maße präintentionales Bewusstsein, in dem sie weder ontologisch stabilisierbar noch zeitlich fixierbar ist. Damit erweist sich dieser durch die phänomenologische Konstruktion aufgedeckte „präintentionale Setzungs- und Vernichtungsakt“ (44) als konkrete Bedingung der Möglichkeit der Phänomenalisierung der Intentionalität, die eben gerade dadurch bestimmt ist, „dass das in ihr Konstituierte nicht in einem ihm Zugrundeliegenden fundiert ist“ (44). Wie ist es aber zu erklären, dass diese „zweifache entgegengesetzte vorsubjektive (und »plastische«) »Tätigkeit« eines Setzens und Aufhebens“ sich nicht einfach als „rein mechanische »Tätigkeit«“ (44) vollzieht, sondern sich bemerkt? Nur dadurch, dass sich die Reflexion der Vorstellung wiederum reflektiert, diesmal eben nicht als Reflexion der Vorstellung, sondern als Reflexion der Reflexion. Damit erschließt sich „das Reflektieren in seiner Reflexionsgesetzmäßigkeit“ (44): Es bekundet sich als Feld des „reinen Ermöglichens“ (45), das an keinem „je schon objektiv Gegebenem“ (44) haftet – weder an einem vorgestellten Gehalt auf der Ebene des immanenten Bewusstseins, noch an der Reflexion dieses Gehalts als bloßer Vorstellung. Diese Reflexion der Reflexion ist das „Urphänomen“ der Phänomenologie der Erkenntnis:  Sie drückt qua „Sich-Erfassen als Sich-Erfassen“ das „reflexible »Grundprinzip« der Ermöglichung des Verstehens von…“ (46) aus – wodurch das Erkennen als Erkennen losgelöst von jedem konkreten Inhalt und damit als Phänomen sui generis auszeichnet wäre. Vor diesem Hintergrund formuliert Schnell das „transzendentale Reflexionsgesetz“, wonach „jedes transzendentale Bedingungsverhältnis seine eigene ermöglichende Verdopplung impliziert“. Die ermöglichende Verdopplung ist eine „produktiv-erzeugende Vernichtung“ (45): Sie vernichtet jede erfahrbare Positivität eines Bedingenden, und macht so ein Bedingtes möglich. Dergestalt weist das transzendentale Reflexionsgesetz nicht lediglich die Ermöglichung dieser oder jener konkreten Möglichkeit, sondern die Ermöglichung jeder Möglichkeit als Möglichkeit – und damit das „allgemeinste Prinzip“ jeder Erkenntnisbegründung – phänomenologisch aus.

Im dritten Kapitel steht die Einbildungskraft als Grundbegriff des transzendentalen Philosophierens im Mittelpunkt. Wie lässt sich am Leitfaden der Einbildungskraft und des Bildes „die Frage nach dem Status der intentionalen Korrelation“ (59) neu aufwerfen und beantworten? Zunächst ist die Korrelation keine „äußere“, die „Subjekt“ und „Objekt“ in ein Verhältnis „partes extra partes“ stellt, sondern sie zeichnet sich durch eine „apriorische Synthetizität“ ihrer Glieder aus. In der Korrelation werden „eine Dimension der »Innerlichkeit«, die dem wahrnehmenden Subjekt eigen ist, und eine Dimension der »Transzendenz«, die dem Wahrgenommenen zugehört, unzertrennlich zusammengehalten“ (62). Das Zugleich von Abstand und Verbindung zwischen Ich und Welt realisiert sich im Bild als „Vektor der transzendentalen Leistungen der Einbildungskraft“ (63). Anders als in der Wahrnehmung und im Urteil, wo stets etwas etwas „gegenüber“ steht, unterläuft die Einbildungskraft so die gängigen, bipolaren Beschreibungen der intentionalen Struktur wie Subjekt/Objekt oder Bewusstsein/Welt. Schnell formalisiert dies als den „doppelten Entwurf des »Anderen-für-das-Selbst« und des »Selbst-im-Anderen«“ (64). Die sich hier abzeichnende „Spannung zwischen einer Immanentisierung und einer radikalen Transzendenz“ (64) ist notwendige Bedingung des phänomenalen Feldes, da es bei Zusammenbruch dieser Spannung sofort implodieren würde – diese „Endo-Exogenisierung“ (64) ist für Schnell die basale Leistung der Einbildungskraft. Wie aber leistet das Bild die „Endo-Exogenisierung“ des phänomenalen Feldes? Durch eine „phänomenalisierende“, eine „fixierende“ und eine „generative“ Dimension. Das Bild lässt etwas „erscheinen“; hierzu muss es „die unendliche Beweglichkeit des »Seienden« »diesseits« seiner Phänomenalisierung“ (65) zugunsten einer relativen Stabilität fixieren, wobei es stets Gefahr läuft, lediglich Scheinbilder oder Simulakren zu erzeugen. „Generativ“ ist das Bild nun in diesem Sinne, dass es auf einer „höheren Stufe […] die Beweglichkeit des phänomenalisierten Seienden widerspiegelt“. In dieser „Verdopplung des Bildbewusstseins“ realisiert sich nicht lediglich eine nachträglich gestiftete Einheit von Phänomenalisierung und ontologischer Stabilisierung, sondern die „»reflexible« Dimension der Einbildungskraft“ (66), die den genuin produktiven Charakter des „Bildens“ über alles „Abbilden“ hinaus ausmacht. Auf dieser „ursprünglich konstitutiven Stufe der intentionalen Korrelation“ (67) sind die Fungierungen und Leistungen der Einbildungskraft „ein Grundbestandteil der Konstitution der Realität“ (67). Hierin liegt der Sinn der Rede von der „imaginären Konstitution der Realität“: Deren Pointe ist es gerade nicht, eine diffuse Kontaminierung des Realen durch das Imaginäre zu konstatieren, sondern umgekehrt das Imaginäre als conditio sine qua non der Bestimmbarkeit des Realen als Reales einsichtig zu machen. Selbstverständlich lassen sich eine Faktualität nackter Tatsachen sowie eine irreduzible Ereignishaftigkeit der Welt „registrieren“, und dennoch: „Sobald diese Realität aber auch nur auf ihre geringste Bestimmtheit hin betrachtet wird, kommt die Einbildungskraft ins Spiel“ (68).

Kapitel vier ist der Frage nach einem „phänomenologischen Unbewussten“ gewidmet. Das Unbewusste ist als ein „bildendes Vermögen“ (78) strukturiert. Schnell unterscheidet „drei Fungierungsarten der Einbildungskraft diesseits des immanenten Bewusstseins“ (84): das genetische phänomenologische Unbewusste, das hypostatische phänomenologische Unbewusste, sowie das reflexible phänomenologische Unbewusste. Das genetische phänomenologische Unbewusste bekundet sich dort, „wo die Sphäre einer »immanenten« Gegebenheit überschritten wird“ (74). Der prekäre Status des genetischen phänomenologischen Unbewussten besteht darin, dass sich „der »positive« – im eigentlichen Sinne »genetische« – Gehalt, der hier aufgedeckt wird, auf nichts »Gegebenes« stützen kann“; stattdessen arbeitet sich die Phänomenologie an einer „gewissermaßen »negative[n]« Dimension des phänomenalen Feldes“, also am „Schwanken“ und der „Flüchtigkeit“ diesseits der Stabilität der objektiven Wirklichkeit“ – der „Genesis“ (75) – ab. Das hypostatisch phänomenologische Unbewusste bezeichnet als zweiter Typus des phänomenologischen Unbewussten dagegen den „ersten Stabilisator aller intellektuellen Tätigkeit“ (76). Es gewinnt der „grundlegenden Tendenz“ der Genesis „zur Mobilität, zur Diversität und zum Wechsel“ (75) qua Einbildungskraft eine gewisse „Unbeweglichkeit und Starre“ (76) ab. Während das genetische phänomenologische Unbewusste grundsätzlich „unendlich variabel“ ist, akzentuiert das hypostatische phänomenologische Unbewusste je „denselben Aspekt des Phänomens“ (76). Als wesentlichsten Unterschied zwischen diesen beiden Typen des phänomenologischen Unbewussten veranschlagt Schnell, „dass das hypostatisch phänomenologische Unbewusste sich grundlegend auf die Realität […] bezieht, während das genetische phänomenologische Unbewusste eher zur Aufklärung einer gewissen Erkenntnisweise der Phänomene beiträgt“ (76f.). Dem dritten Typus des phänomenologischen Unbewussten – dem reflexiblen Unbewussten – obliegt darüber hinaus die Aufgabe, das konstituierende „Vermögen des phänomenologischen Diskurses selbst“ (77) einsichtig zu machen. Das „»Gesetz« des »Sichreflektierens« der Reflexion“ (78) entfaltet die Einbildungskraft in „all ihre[r] konstitutive[n] und reflektierende[n] Kraft“ (78) und „begründet“ damit „die »imaginäre Konstitution« der Realität“ (78).  Wie verhält sich ein derart bestimmtes Unbewusstes nun zum Selbstbewusstsein? Die These der generativen Phänomenologie lautet, dass „das Selbstbewusstsein im Gegenstandsbewusstsein […] sich nicht reflexiv erklären“ lässt, sondern einen „unmittelbaren Bezug“ voraussetzt, der „eben in den Bereich des Unbewussten“ (79) fällt. Dieser kann „nicht »phänomenologisch konstruiert«“ (80) werden, und unterscheidet sich so von den drei entwickelten Typen des phänomenologischen Unbewussten. Damit positioniert sich die generative Phänomenologie auf einer Linie mit Fichte in klarer Abgrenzung zu „reflexiven Explikationsmodellen des Selbstbewusstseins“ (80). Selbstbewusstsein gründet nicht auf einem Bewusstseinsakt höherer Stufe, der sich von einem erststufigen Bewusstseinsakt numerisch unterscheidet, sondern ist als eine „»präreflexive« Dimension“ (81) in die erststufige, gegenstandsgerichtete Intention „eingebildet“. Der „unbewusste“ Charakter des Selbstbewusstseins besteht demzufolge darin, dass „der Intentionalität (zumindest teilweise) eine Nicht-Intentionalität zugrunde liegt“ (81).

Welchen Beitrag kann ein generativer Ansatz transzendentalen Philosophierens nun zu den gegenwärtigen Kontroversen leisten, die von einem neuerdings erhobenen „realistischen“ Ton in der Philosophie geprägt sind? Ebendiesen legt Kapitel fünf dar. Primäres Ziel ist es, den Standpunkt des Korrelationismus zu präzisieren – „und zwar eben durch das Prisma der Bestimmung der Realität“. Somit gilt es sowohl zu verstehen, was „jedem intentionalen Akt »Realität« zukommen lässt“, als auch „welcher Status der »Realität« dem, was über das Bewusstsein »hinausreicht«, zuzuschreiben ist“ (90). Der Beitrag der generativen Phänomenologie erweist sich als komplexe wie nuancierte Ausarbeitung einer irreduziblen Multidimensionalität des Realitäts-Begriffs. Eines einseitigen Idealismus ist sie dabei deshalb völlig unverdächtig, weil die Grundkategorien der Phänomenalisierung für ihre „realitätsstiftenden Leistungen ein wechselseitiges Bedingungsverhältnis mit dem Konstituierten“ (108) implizieren. Transzendentale Konstitution kann sich nur als ontologische Fundierung realisieren, welche – einer Art fortwährenden „Epigenese“ nicht unähnlich – die Konstitution selbst kontaminiert. Was die generative Phänomenologie deutlich von gängigen Realismen abhebt, ist die Erarbeitung zahlreicher Aspekte der Nicht-Gegebenheit, die maßgeblich zur Sachhaltigkeit und Intelligibilität des Begriffs der Realität beitragen. Denn „[d]as Reale ist nicht das Gegebene“ (90): Hierfür sprechen die Rolle der Unscheinbarkeit und der Präreflexivität in der Phänomenalisierung, die Präimmanenz als „Milieu“ der Genesis, sowie die reflexive Vernichtung des Bewusstseins in jeder stabilisierten Bestimmung – „das Bewusstsein ist das Vehikel des Gegebenseins, die Realität ist das Zugrundegehen des Bewusstseins“ (91). Den „höchsten Punkt“ der generativen Realitätsproblematik bildet die „Identifikation von Realität und »Reflexion der Reflexion«“ (108), welche die Zusammengehörigkeit des transzendentalen und des ontologischen Status des in der Sinnbildung Eröffneten stiftet. Zu erwähnen ist zudem das den Ausführungen zur „Realität“ angestellte „anankologische Argument“, welches Schnell gegen die Angriffe des „spekulativen Realismus“ auf den „Korrelationismus“ bemüht. Zu Erinnerung: Eine anzestrale Aussage bezieht sich auf einen Sachverhalt, der vor jeglicher tatsächlichen Gegebenheit von Bewusstsein gültig gewesen sein soll, wodurch die angebliche Überflüssigkeit des Korrelationismus aufgezeigt sein soll. Wie aber dem anzestral Bedeuteten die Notwendigkeit objektiver Realität zuweisen? Ohne ein in die Sinnbildung einbehaltenes Bewusstsein kann nicht darüber befunden werden, welche anzestralen Propositionen der Wahrheit entsprechen, und welche nicht – die Möglichkeit, den Sinn einer solchen Proposition zu verstehen, wäre nicht gegeben: „Während beim klassischen ontologischen Argument die Hypothese des Denkens der Wesenheit des Absoluten die Existenz des Absoluten impliziert, schließt hier […] die Existenz der Anzestralität die Notwendigkeit der möglichen Gegebenheit für und durch das sinnbildende Bewusstsein“ (112) ein. Das heißt: Durch die wohlgegründete Behauptung der Anzestralität wird die „Generativität“ des Korrelationismus bewiesen. Dieser pocht im vorliegenden Fall ja gerade nicht auf ein konstituierendes Subjekt, das einem – letztlich nicht intelligiblen – Gegenstand gegenübersteht, sondern ist als jener Sinnbildungsprozess konzipiert, in dessen Genesis sich die notwendige Sachhaltigkeit respektive die Nicht-Halluziniertheit des anzestralen Gegenstandes überhaupt erst herauskristallisieren und stabilisieren konnte.

Kapitel fünf behandelt den Begriff der Wahrheit. Die Phänomenologie fragt nicht primär nach der Wahrheit der „Korrespondenz“ qua logischem oder sinnlichem Zusammenhang zwischen einem Aussagesatz und der ihm entsprechenden Realität, sondern danach, wie sich eine Welteröffnung vollzieht, im Rahmen derer sich etwas als etwas zeigen kann, und damit überhaupt erst „Korrespondenz“-fähig wird. Zentral ist demnach das „konstitutive Verhältnis zwischen der Korrespondenz-Wahrheit und der »ursprünglichen« Wahrheit“ (129). Drei Dimensionen der Wahrheit werden hier relevant: Die „phänomenalisierende Dimension der Wahrheit“ verweist darauf, dass „jegliche[r] »Gegenstand« der Wahrheit“ (129), auf irgendeine Weise zur Darstellung gelangen muss, womit die Entdeckung einer „Sache“ auf eine „konstitutive Weise in ihr Wahrsein“ eintritt. Die „phänomenalisierende Wahrheit“ ist als eine „Manifestierung für… (Erscheinung für…, Gegebenheit für…) einen »Zeugen de jure«“ (130) notwendige, aber keine hinreichende Bedingung jeder Wahrheit. Die zweite Dimension betrifft den „Entzugscharakter der Wahrheit“: In einem transzendentalen Bedingungsverhältnis realisiert sich die Objektivierung eines Bedingten durch den Entzug seines Bedingenden – ein Entzug, der als „negativer Bezug“ in „jede Manifestierung, Erscheinung oder Gegebenheit hineinspielt“ (131). Der Entzug kann sich nun aber als Selbstreflexion dieses „wechselseitigen Bedingungsverhältnisses“ genetisieren, dergestalt, dass er sich als „stetige[r] Wechsel zwischen einer »Präsenz« und einer »Nicht-Präsenz«“ (132) realisiert. Eine solche „Erfahrung“ des Transzendentalen impliziert, „dass das Bedingte auf das Bedingende zurückwirkt“ (131), was eben die Wahrheit „der Erscheinung bzw. der Gegebenheit selbst ausmacht“ (132). Der dritten, der „generativen Dimension der Wahrheit“, obliegt eine doppelte Aufgabe: Sie bestimmt den Entzugscharakter der Wahrheit auf positive Weise und macht verständlich, was genau die Wahrheitsdimension des konstruktiven Vorgehens kennzeichnet. Beides leistet sie als Reflexion der Reflexion: „Die Wahrheit ist die Reflexion der Reflexion […].“ (132) In einem ersten Schritt stellt sie einen Abstand her, in dem sich der Entzugscharakter spiegelt; in einem zweiten Schritt erweist sich die Wahrheit als „produktive Reflexivität“, als eine „erzeugende, schöpferische, d.h. generative Dimension“. Die Wahrheit ist die Dimension, in der sich das Transzendentale als reines Vermögen der Realisierung selbst realisiert: Ein Gegenstand wird reflexiv gesetzt, wodurch dessen Reflexionsgesetz allererst bedingt wird. Nur so entsteht überhaupt ein „Probierstein der Realität“ (133), dergestalt, dass ein Gegenstand nach Maßgabe der präimmanenten Binnendifferenzierung, in welcher sich die Ermöglichung seines So-Seins herausbildet, thematisierbar wird. Denn ein Gegenstand, der eine Aussage wahr macht, ist nicht selbst die Wahrheit; die Wahrheit ist die reflexive Bezugsdimension, eine Art intelligibler Holon, in welchem der Gegenstand als Einheit der Differenz von Reflexion der Reflexion und Realität appräsentierbar ist. Die logische Gestalt, in welcher sich dies zusammen denken lässt, ist die „kategorische Hypothetizität“ (134): Sie bezeichnet den Umschlag einer Möglichkeit in eine Notwendigkeit im Vollzug der Genetisierung einer nicht weiter deskriptiv analysierbaren Gegebenheit qua phänomenologischer Konstruktion – und damit einen Vorschlag zur Lösung der Frage, wie das Notwendige möglich ist. Dass ein solcher „Sprung im Register“ sich in actu realisiert und nicht „untergeschoben“ wird, befreit den generativen Wahrheitsbegriff aus den vitiösen Zirkeln, welche transzendentales und hermeneutisches Philosophieren bis heute prägen.

Das sechste Kapitel unternimmt eine Abhandlung des Problems der Zeit. Wenn die Zeit weder eine subjektive noch eine objektive „Form“, wenn ihre „Vorausgesetztheit“ nicht empirisch-real noch rein logisch ist, sie sowohl in ihrer transzendentalen „Idealität“ wie auch in ihrer empirischen „Realität“ zu denken ist: Wie kann die von Husserl eingeführte, genuin zeitkonstituierende Intentionalität bestimmt werden? „Aktiv-signitiver“ Art kann sie nicht sein, da es sich „um keinerlei bedeutungsstiftende Intentionalität“ (146) handelt; „passiv-intuitiver“ Art kann sie aber auch nicht sein – zwar ist sie sicherlich passiv in dem Sinne, dass sie nicht eigens hervorzubringen ist, aber Anschaulichkeit reicht nicht hin, um ihre präintentionale Konstitution verständlich zu machen. Es gilt also, qua phänomenologischer Konstruktion eine Form der Selbstgegebenheit aufzuzeigen, die weder „auf ein rein passives Vorliegen, noch auf eine Einbettung der Spontaneität in eine [bereits objektiv konstituierte, F.E.] zeitlich-sinnliche Dimension verweist“ (150). Hierzu unterscheidet Schnell zuerst zwei Arten der immanenten Zeitlichkeit, „erlebte Zeit“ und „gestiftete Zeit“: Die erlebte Zeit umfasst das volle Spektrum der Möglichkeiten von Erscheinungsweisen der Zeit – jedes Seiende hat seine ihm „ureigene Zeit“ (148). Spezifisch für die erlebte Zeit ist ihre enge Verflochtenheit mit der Erfahrung eines „Ich“: Sie erzeugt stets nicht-anonyme „Weisen der Horizonteröffnung, die zuallererst für uns selbst die Welt offenbar zu machen gestatten“. Des Weiteren zeichnet sie sich durch „radikale Reflexionslosigkeit“ (148) aus. Die gestiftete Zeit hingegen zielt auf Einheitlichkeit, auf einen Maßstab, der zur „Zeitmessung“ dienen kann. Dabei kommt es zu einem „Gegensatz zwischen der Vielfalt der Zeiten […] und der Einheit der gestifteten Zeit“ (149), sowie zu einer Aporie der Reflexion: Innerhalb der gestifteten Zeit wird ein absoluter Zeitrahmen vorausgesetzt, der „präempirisch und präreflexiv“ ist; die Einheitlichkeit ist aber ein Produkt der Reflexion. Die Reflexion ist demnach nicht das geeignete Mittel, „um die Konstitution der Zeit und des Zeitbewusstseins verständlich zu machen und zu rechtfertigen“ (149). Wie ist es also möglich, dem „Zeitcharakter der erlebten Zeit einerseits und der gestifteten Zeit andererseits phänomenologisch-konstruktiv […] auf die Spur zu kommen“ (150)?  Dargelegt werden muss, wie die Vermittlung von „Protentionalität“ und „Retentionalität“ zu plausibilisieren ist, ohne das Schema Auffassung/Auffassungsinhalt auf eine „rein hyletische Urimpression“ anzuwenden. Hier kommt eine dritte Art der Zeitlichkeit zum Tragen, die „präimmanente Zeit“. Diese stellt sich dar als ein die immanenten Zeitlichkeiten konstituierendes Phasenkontinuum, der „Urprozess“. Jede Phase dieses Kontinuums ist ein „»retentionales« und »protentionales« Ganzes“ (151), und besteht aus einem „Kern“ – auch als „Urphase“ bezeichnet – maximaler Erfüllung, sowie aus modifizierten Kernen, deren Erfüllung proportional zur Entfernung von der Urphase nach Null hin tendiert. Dergestalt eröffnet sich ein Feld von „Kernen“, die „im Ablauf ihrer Erfüllungen und Entleerungen eben die präimmanente Zeitlichkeit ausmachen“ (152), und als „Substrate“ der Noesis die Intentionalität strukturell konstituieren. Das „Selbsterscheinen“ (153) dieses Urprozesses am Schnittpunkt der jeweils diskreten „Kerne“ ermöglicht ineins die ursprüngliche Gegenwart des präreflexiven Selbstbewusstseins wie auch jede gestiftete und erlebte Zeit.

Die räumlichen Aspekte der generativen Phänomenologie sind Gegenstand des siebten Kapitels. Ziel ist es, die Konstitution der Räumlichkeit und des Räumlichkeitsbewusstseins zu erhellen. Grundlegende Beiträge liefern Husserl mit der Darstellung der Relevanz von „Leiblichkeit“ und „Einbildungskraft“ bei der Konstitution des Raumes, sowie Heidegger durch die Vorarbeiten zum Begriff einer Endo-Exogenisierung des phänomenologischen Feldes. Maßgeblich für den Ansatz der „Wirklichkeitsbilder“ sind jedoch die Analysen, die Marc Richir hinsichtlich der räumlichen Aspekte der Sinnbildung vorgelegt hat. Leitend sind dabei zwei Fragestellungen: Was ist die leibliche Dimension der Sinnbildung? Was sichert und ermöglicht den Bezug auf eine Äußerlichkeit, die es vermeidet, diese Sinnbildung durch ihre Immanentisierung in eine Tautologie verfallen zu lassen? An diese Perspektive anschließend sucht Schnell „Räumlichkeit“ als eine „grundlegende Dimension des Sinnbildungsprozesses“ (171) in den Blick zu bekommen. Hierzu wird eine dreifache Differenz angesetzt: Die räumliche Bestimmtheit der „scheinbaren Exogenität“ in natürlicher Einstellung – also die Erfahrung einer „Äußerlichkeit“, die als „präexistent“ oder „prästabilisiert“ angesehen wird –, verwischt die Notwendigkeit, diesseits der Unterscheidung von „Innen“ und „Außen“ ein diese Unterscheidung erst ermöglichendes „Vermittlungsverhältnis von Endogenität und Exogenität des phänomenologischen Feldes“ (172) zu konzipieren. Die „räumliche Dimension der Hypostase“ thematisiert den Umstand, dass trotz der Zusammengehörigkeit von Räumlichkeit und Zeitlichkeit als „Raumzeitlichkeit“ – der „Grundform der Phänomenalisierung“ (173) –, spezifische Unterschiede zwischen räumlichen und zeitlichen Bestimmungen bestehen. Während die Zeit grundlegend durch ein Fließen charakterisiert ist, erscheint der Raum hingegen „fix, stabil, unwandelbar“. „Hypostase“ als „transzendentaler Ausdruck“ dieser Stabilität ist qua phänomenologischer Konstruktion zweiter Gattung als produktive Vernichtung der Bewegung zu fassen, dahingehend, „dass hierdurch sowohl die räumliche Dimension des Verstehens als auch das, worin das Verstehen sich entfaltet, gedacht zu werden vermag“ (174). Als dritte räumliche Bestimmtheit werden die „räumlichen Implikationen der transzendierenden Reflexibilität“ entfaltet. Während die „transzendentale Reflexibilität“ als die Eigenschaft der Sinnbildung ausgemacht wurde, welche die „innerlichen Notwendigkeiten“ des phänomenalen Feldes aufdeckt, kommt es hier darauf an, die „transzendierende Reflexibilität“ als die Eigenschaft der Sinnbildung zu begreifen, welche die „äußerlichen Notwendigkeiten“ des phänomenalen Feldes zu erschließen gestattet. Ausschlaggebend ist dabei, dass diese nicht lediglich auf etwas Vorgängiges reflektiert, sondern „das Sich-erscheinen des (Sich-)reflektierens erfasst wird“. Ermöglicht ist dies durch eine „Identifikation zwischen dem Abstand von Alterität und Äußerlichkeit“ (175), sowie ein dem Sinnbildungs-Schematismus innewohnender Abstand zu sich selbst; beide Aspekte fungieren als basaler Bezugsrahmen jeder weiteren räumlichen Bestimmbarkeit.

Das achte Kapitel wendet sich der Konzeption einer neuen phänomenologischen Anthropologie zu, in deren Zentrum der Begriff des „homo imaginans“ steht. Bei der generativen Konturierung des Humanum steht nicht das Verhältnis von Anthropologie und Phänomenologie im Mittelpunkt, sondern diejenigen Bestimmungen, welches es ermöglichen, den „Status des Menschen diesseits der Unterscheidung von Erkenntnistheorie und Ontologie“ (187) offen zu legen. Jeder Bestimmung gehen genetisch-imaginative Prozesse voraus, welche die Intelligibilität einer möglichen Bestimmung erst gewährleisten. Um einer „vorausgesetzten Welt“ anzugehören, muss der Mensch immer schon dreifach „bildend“ tätig gewesen sein: qua Vorstellung, qua Reflexion, und qua Einbildung. Die „Vorstellung“ ist das Phänomen, „durch das wir uns ursprünglich auf die Welt beziehen“ (188). Sie lässt erscheinen, nach Maßgabe implizierter Verständnisse von „Welt“ und „Selbst“. In der „Reflexion“ wird das Bild als Bild thematisch, gerät in einen Abstand zu sich: Die Welt geht in ihrem Bild nicht auf. In der Vernichtung der „Kompaktheit und Geschlossenheit“ (191) des ersten Bildes wird das ihm implizite „Selbst“ als entwerfendes explizit; die im ersten Bild prätendierte Stabilität der Welt wird in eine irreduzible Abständigkeit von Bild und Welt transponiert, die selbstverständliche Unmittelbarkeit des Bildes wandelt sich in das reflexive Bewusstsein, durch ein Selbst geleistet worden zu sein – an die Stelle eines Bildes der Welt tritt ein Bild des Selbst. Der spezifisch menschliche – nicht mechanische! – Charakter der Reflexion wird aber erst mit der „Einbildung“ erfasst: Jedes Bewusstsein von etwas ist nicht nur „vorstellendes“ und „reflexives“ Bewusstsein, sondern auch „reflexibles“ Bewusstsein. Das, was es möglich macht, verdoppelt sich in „das, was das Möglich-Machen selbst möglich macht“ (192) – die „bedingende“ Möglichkeit erscheint selbst in ihrem Vermögen, das, was möglich macht, ihrerseits möglich zu machen. Anders formuliert: Das Sein-Können der Bild-Bildung erscheint in den zu diesem Können notwendigen Bedingungen. In der Reflexion auf die Reflexion der Vorstellung realisiert sich die transzendentale Struktur des Bewusstseins als die Ermöglichung ihrer selbst – diese „ist“ nur, insofern sie sich „bildet“. Nachdem die generative Verfahrensweise ihre Rechtmäßigkeit durch die Wohlgegründetheit – ohne „negativen“ Zirkel – ihrer Möglichkeit erwiesen hat, kommt als ihr Korrelat nur das Reale selbst in Frage. Die ontologischen Implikationen dieses Realen sind eben jene Bedingungen, die zur Realisierung des „ermöglichenden Vermögens“ (193) zu veranschlagen sind. Der Mensch ist „homo imaginans“ bedeutet dann: Jedes Bewusstsein, das sich als Einheit der Differenz von Selbstentwurf, Reflexivität und Reflexibilität selbst erscheint, ist humanes Bewusstsein.

Das letzte Kapitel dient einer Synopse der Grundlegung eines spekulativen Transzendentalismus in der Gestalt einer generativen Phänomenologie. Schnell hebt als Leitmotiv die „Endoexogenisierung des phänomenalen Feldes“ als neue, „auf die Transzendenz hinausweisende“ Dimension der Subjektivität hervor, die „den konstitutiven Vorrang der Einbildungskraft“ (195) als „Matrize der Subjektivität“ (198) sichtbar werden lässt. Die Pointe ist dabei, dass „die Transzendenz nicht bloß das »formale Andere« des konstitutiven Vermögens“ der Subjektivität ist, sondern diese „gleichsam selbst konstituiert“ (198). Vier Spielarten der Transzendenz bilden dabei den Möglichkeitsraum der Phänomenalisierung des Subjekts im Prozess der Sinnbildung: „Prinzip oder absolutes Ich“, „Welt“, „Radikale Alterität“, „Absolute Transzendenz“. Durch die Aufweisung eines „phänomenalisierenden“ Moments, eines „plastischen-vernichtenden und zugleich hypostatischen“ – und dank dieses Zusammenwirkens „reflexiven“ – Moments, sowie eines „reflexiblen“ Moments bekundet sich die Einbildungskraft als „ursprünglich bildendes Vermögen“ in phänomenologischen Konstruktionen, wobei keine epistemische oder ontologische Priorität eines dieser Momente festzustellen ist. Die qua phänomenologischer Konstruktion anvisierten „transzendentalen Erfahrungen“ konkretisieren sich in Auseinandersetzung mit jeweiligen „phänomenalen Gehalten“. Sie „gelingen“ als „Fundierung ohne Fundament“ (209), wenn die Genesis der Faktualität vollzogen werden kann, und die „Möglichkeit der Notwendigkeit“ am Zu-Genetisierenden verständlich wird.

Liest man die „Wirklichkeitsbilder“ im Kontext seiner bisherigen – mehrheitlich französischsprachigen – Forschungen, wird einsichtig, auf welchem Reflexionsniveau Schnell den transzendentalen Problemhorizont entwickelt. Verglichen mit dem Stand aktueller Literatur zum Thema ist der hier zum Einsatz kommende Begriff des Transzendentalen in seiner systematischen Prägnanz und historischen Tiefe beispiellos: Die von Kant angestrebte Erkenntnislegitimation wird unternommen, der spekulativ-imaginative Ansatz Fichtes in die Auseinandersetzung mit konkreten phänomenalen Gehalten gebracht, der von Schelling beschriebene Prozess der Selbst-Objektivierung der Natur in seinen architektonischen Implikationen als wechselseitiges Bedingungsverhältnis entfaltet, Husserls Überforderung der Anschauung in transzendentaler Perspektive mithilfe neu entwickelter Kriterien phänomenologischer Ausweisbarkeit zur Disposition gestellt, und schließlich Heideggers Figur der „Ermöglichung“ ausgestaltet. Die transzendentalphilosophische Gretchen-Frage, wie das Apriori selbst begründet werden kann, ist pointiert entwickelt und aufschlussreich beantwortet; die generative Plausibilisierung der Möglichkeit, wie durch apriorische Denkformen das Seiende in seiner Realität erfasst werden kann, ist erstrangig unter den bisherigen Versuchen der phänomenologisch-transzendentalen Tradition. Gerade für Skeptiker eines transzendentalen Philosophie-Stils wird es überraschend ein, dass der Begriff der Realität letztlich nur „gewinnt“: Keine einzige empirisch-inhaltliche Bestimmung des Realen wird in ihrer Gültigkeit desavouiert, sondern lediglich in einen Bezugsrahmen transponiert, der die Möglichkeit ihrer Wohlgegründetheit verständlich macht. Der vor allem gegen Fichte oft vorgebrachte Einwand, weshalb der Realismus erst auf einer „Meta-Stufe“ einsetzen sollte, verliert durch die Herausstellung der Einheit des transzendentalen und ontologischen Status des in der präimmanenten Sphäre Eröffneten an Wucht. Diese Einheit ist dabei keine De-Realisierung „objektiver“ Sachhaltigkeit, sondern eröffnet die Möglichkeit, eine Zusammengehörigkeit von Realitätsbestimmung und Erkenntnislegitimation so zu denken, dass einsehbar wird, wie Aussagen überhaupt Gegenstände „treffen“ können. So verwandelt sich der „Korrelationismus“ am Leitfaden seiner „Endo-Exogenisierung“ in eine philosophische Position mit einer Leistungsfähigkeit, sowohl der „Immanenz“ als auch der „Transzendenz“ Rechnung zu tragen, die ihm in diesem Ausmaß wohl selbst von seinen Verfechtern kaum mehr zugetraut wurde. Es bleibt abzuwarten, ob sich Realismen, die eine robuste Schlichtheit und Selbstverständlichkeit des Sich-Beziehen-Könnens auf Reales als besonders „realistisch“ inszenieren, sich der in der generativen Phänomenologie erschlossenen Komplexität des Zustandekommens eines nicht-trivialen, sachhaltig bestimmbaren Realitäts-Begriffs stellen. Geschieht dies nicht, befänden wir uns in einer für jeden „Realismus“ wenig schmeichelhaften ideengeschichtlichen Lage, in der ein phänomenologisch fundierter, aber nichtsdestotrotz spekulativer Transzendentalismus zum begrifflichen Kern seiner ureigenen Ambition wesentlich mehr beizutragen hätte als er selbst.

Auch das phänomenologische Pensum der „Wirklichkeitsbilder“ ist beachtlich. Schnell beherrscht die klassische Phänomenologie (Husserl, Heidegger, Fink) ebenso differenziert wie die französische Phänomenologie (vor allem Levinas und Richir). Besonders hervorzuheben ist dabei sein elaborierter Umgang mit zentralen Aspekten des Werks des hierzulande noch kaum erschlossenen belgischen Phänomenologen Marc Richir, dem der so zentrale Begriff eines Sich-bildenden-Sinns (sens se faisant) entlehnt ist. Und unabhängig davon, ob die konkrete methodische Verfahrensweise der phänomenologischen Konstruktion anerkannt und praktiziert wird, ist die Trias der Tatsachen, welche die generative Phänomenologie ausweist, unter allen Umständen ein bleibender Ertrag: An der Unterscheidung zwischen „Urtatsachen“ als Thema phänomenologischer Metaphysik, „Gegebenheits-Tatsachen“ plus präreflexiver Implikationen als Thema deskriptiver Phänomenologie und „präintentionalen Tatsachen“ als Thema konstruktiver Phänomenologie dürfte für jede zukünftige Phänomenologie kein Weg vorbei führen. Besonders verdient macht sich die generative Phänomenologie zudem um den Begriff der Intentionalität: Dieser droht zu Beginn des 21. Jahrhunderts zunehmend zu einem metaphysischen Ausgangspunkt der philosophischen Theorie-Bildung zu gerinnen, dessen weiterer Erklärung es nicht mehr bedarf. Ein avancierter Bild-Begriff scheint dabei eine viel versprechende Herangehensweise, das Projekt einer „systematischen Enthüllung der konstituierenden Intentionalität selbst“ (Hua I, 164) als unabdingbare Aufgabe des Phänomenologisierens weiterhin ernst zu nehmen. In den „Wirklichkeitsbildern“ zeichnet sich ab, dass er durchaus über das nötige Potenzial verfügt, das oft übergangene, aber grundlegende Problem der Motivation und Begründetheit der „Leerintentionalität“ als pronominalem Bezug auf ein ens intentum tantum – ein „Alles“ ohne definierte Grenze – neu und äußerst erhellend aufzuwerfen. Hier könnte die generative Phänomenologie wichtige Fragen klären, die auch in der Sinnfeldontologie von Markus Gabriel aufkommen – Fragen, die allesamt um das Sein des Sinns kreisen –, dort aber bisher einer überzeugenden Lösung harren.

Wie es seitens des Phänomenologinnen allerdings aufgenommen werden wird, dass Schnell nicht das Transzendentale zugunsten des „Prinzips aller Prinzipien“ kippt, sondern umgekehrt dem „Prinzip aller Prinzipien“ zugunsten des Transzendentalen als methodologischer Grundlage eine dezidierte Absage erteilt, bleibt abzuwarten. Hier bedarf es wahrscheinlich noch weiterer Klärungs- und Darstellungsarbeit, um die spezifische Intuitivität der phänomenologischen Konstruktionen auch für SkeptikerInnen der Möglichkeit einer Imaginations-basierten „Fundierung ohne Fundament“ zu erschließen. Denn auch die „Wirklichkeitsbilder“ sind kraft ihres methodischen Anspruchs von dem mitunter quasi-weltanschaulich geführten Disput betroffen, ob es eine genuine phänomenologische Methodologie überhaupt gibt. Jedoch ist das Reflexionsniveau und das Rezeptionsspektrum der generativen Phänomenologie wesentlich höher zu veranschlagen als das von populären Bestreitungen der Möglichkeit phänomenologischer Methodologie, wie sie beispielsweise Tom Sparrow mit „The End of Phenomenology“ vorgelegt hat. In diesem Text werden weder die systematischen Verbindungslinien zwischen Phänomenologie und Transzendentalphilosophie noch die neuesten Entwicklungen der phänomenologischen Theorie-Bildung berücksichtigt, was die Ergebnisse entweder zur Glaubensfrage oder obsolet macht – eine Alternative, die doch gerade der Phänomenologie vorgeworfen wird. Die Herausforderung bleibt dennoch bestehen: Jede Phänomenologie, so binnendifferenziert sie auch sein mag, muss sich zusätzlich an der Möglichkeit messen lassen, ob sie über den Kreis derer, die sich schon für sie als Philosophie-Stil der Wahl entschieden haben, auf eine Weise rezipierbar ist, die ihr ein nachhaltiges Sich-Einschreiben in einen globalen Austausch des Philosophierens erlaubt. Dies kann und muss sie einerseits durch die Sachhaltigkeit ihrer Darstellungen, aber auch durch die Ernstnahme der zeitgenössischen hermeneutischen Situation leisten, die nach wie vor durch naturalistische und wieder durch metaphysische Grund-Orientierungen geprägt ist. Für einen Text mit methodologischem Anspruch wie die „Wirklichkeitsbilder“ könnte dies beispielsweise bedeuten, den Begriff der phänomenologischen Konstruktion und den Begriff der Abduktion als methodische Optionen mit jeweiligen epistemologischen und ontologischen Implikationen explizit zueinander in Beziehung zu setzen, um Ausgangspunkte für Diskussionen zu erzeugen, die Stil-unabhängig geführt werden können.

Abschließend bleibt zu erwähnen, dass sich der vorliegende Ansatz als äußerst wertvoll zur Re-Vitalisierung einer phänomenologischen Psychopathologie erweisen könnten. Einiges deutet darauf hin, dass die sich dort artikulierenden Blockierungen des Selbst- und Welt-Vollzugs stärker als bisher herausgestellt imaginativer Natur sind. In vielen pathologisch relevanten Fällen ist eine „Monotonie des Bildbildungsschemas“ (Blankenburg) auffällig, die bisher nicht systematisch als spezifische Modifikationen der Einbildungskraft identifizierbar werden, welche in einer ko-generativen Beziehung zum leichter ausweisbaren, veränderten Reflexions- und Affekt-Erleben stehen. Hier drängt sich die Frage auf, ob nicht „diesseits“ aller gängigen Unterscheidungen – Verstand / Gefühl / Leib / Gemeinschaft / Welt – bisher nicht explizit thematisierbare Weisen der Wieder-Intensivierung der imaginativen Ressourcen in den Blick kommen könnten. Dies wäre jedenfalls ab dem Moment möglich und sinnvoll, in dem die imaginäre Konstitution der Wirklichkeit auf grundbegrifflicher Ebene hinreichend plausibilisiert und ausgearbeitet wäre – hierzu sind die „Wirklichkeitsbilder“ ein gewaltiger und verdienstvoller Schritt.

Theodor Lipps: Schriften zur Einfühlung: Mit einer Einleitung und Anmerkungen

Schriften zur Einfühlung: Mit einer Einleitung und Anmerkungen Book Cover Schriften zur Einfühlung: Mit einer Einleitung und Anmerkungen
Studien zur Phänomenologie und Praktischen Philosophie
Theodor Lipps. Faustino Fabbianelli (Hg.)
Ergon Verlag
2018
Paperback 78.00 €
792

Reviewed by: Mariano Crespo (Universidad de Navarra)

Any moderately attentive observer of contemporary philosophy is bound to notice the significant number of publications dedicated to what has come to be called «empathy.» The relevance of this topic has also found its place in non-philosophical forums, for example Barack Obama’s much-cited statement during his first presidential campaign that «the empathy deficit is a more pressing political problem for America than the federal deficit» or one of the central claims in Jeremy Rifkin’s acclaimed book, The Empathic Civilization. In general and as has been pointed out recently, there are two reasons for this renewed interest in empathy—on the one hand, moral philosophers have presented research on whether empathy plays an important role in motivating pro-social or altruistic behavior and, on the other hand, social knowledge researchers have hypothesized that empathy could be the key to understanding important issues regarding interpersonal understanding, particularly with respect to understanding other people’s emotions. In addition, a diversity of perspectives has addressed this topic, including phenomenology, cognitive sciences, social sciences, psychiatry, etc. This mix has led to the unexaggerated estimate that there are as many definitions of empathy as there are authors who have attempted to define it. In any case, and in spite of the great diversity of theories on empathy, most authors usually cite Theodor Lipps (1851-1914) as one of the “fathers” of empathy. In turn, the British psychologist Edward Titchener (1867-1927) translated the term Einfühlung (which Lipps used) into English as empathy, a translation that is not without its problems, as I will later demonstrate.

One of the many merits of the volume that brings together Lipps’ texts on the problem of Einfühlung, which Faustino Fabbianelli edited and introduced, is its success in showing the need to dually expand the perspective of analysis when it comes to this German thinker. Certainly, Lipps used the term Einfühlung to refer to knowledge of other selves versus the knowledge of the self (internal perception) and the knowledge of external objects (sensible perception). However, to expand this analysis, we must not forget that Einfühlung is one way, among others, of explaining the other’s experience (Fremderfahrung). In other words, in light of current comparisons between what is usually called empathy and the experience of the other tout court, we must show that this version is a peculiar way of interpreting the other’s experience.

The question of the other’s experience (Fremderfahrung), that is, of the experience we have of other selves and their lived experiences, was the object of special attention at the end of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Two groups of theories emerged in this respect: on the one hand, one group maintains that that which is given to us in the proper sense is our own self and, therefore, access to the other’s conscience is always mediated and, on the other hand, those who reject that our access to the other’s conscience is always mediated. The first group of theories argues that the experience of the other is always experience of him in his corporeal appearance. I experience my own lived experiences in a unique, immediate, and original way, while I do not experience the lived experiences of others in this way. What is given to me from another human being in the proper sense, originaliter, corresponds exclusively to the phenomenon of the physical body. Based solely on this form of giving oneself, the other is considered somehow animated; an other self exists. One of the ways to access this other self corresponds to so-called «reasoning by analogy theories» (Analogieschlusstheorien), which maintain that I «judge» the expressions of others in analogy with my own expressions, that is, I know that these expressions (Lebensäusserungen) (for example, certain face gestures) contain certain experiences that imitate my own experience when I so gesture.

These theories received significant criticism, especially from Theodor Lipps, who worked in Germany in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. As one of the texts in Fabbianelli’s volume (Eine Vorfrage: Die Vielheit der Iche und die Einfühlung, p. 351) argues, Lipps considers these theories inadequate for two fundamental reasons. On the one hand, I am aware of, for example, certain eye or mouth gestures not because I observe my own expressions, but because I am able to observe others’ expressions; this observation occurs in the exact opposite order with regard to the Analogieschlusstheorien. In fact, Lipps believes that certain processes in other people’s bodies express lived experiences, which are then accompanied by gestures that express these lived experiences. On the other hand, he considers reasoning by analogy a fiction. Such reasoning, Lipps argues, takes place when, for example, I see smoke and conclude that there is fire. At some point, I saw smoke and fire together and now I add to the perceived smoke that which I have repeatedly perceived as associated with it. But such reasoning does not apply here. Rather, I have to deduce from myself an object that, although it is the same type, is completely different from me. In addition, theories of reasoning by analogy assume that I know that the meaning of my own facial gestures denote certain experiences. If this were the case, I would need to constantly observe my face in a mirror. According to Lipps, the following is what really occurs: I see another’s features change, which I interpret as the body of another human individual. An internal tendency to tune in arises in me and suggests that I should act and feel in sync with the other. I feel his sadness not as conditioned by my own thoughts, but as brought on by a perceived gesture. I feel my own sadness by perceiving the other’s gesture (Egoismus und Altruismus, p. 211).

As mentioned, Fabbianelli’s selected texts from Lipps—which do not include the important article entitled, «Das Wissen von fremden Ichen» (which was already published by the same editor in the fourth volume of Schriften zur Psychologie und Erkenntnistheorie and recently translated into English[i]), but which does include the previously unpublished article Der Begriff der Einfühlung–show the need to broaden the usual analysis of Lipps’ Einfühlung notion. That is, it is unjustifiably reductionist to consider Einfühlung the only way of explaining the Fremderfahrung (although, certainly, it is the right way, according to Lipps), as well as to think that Einfühlung’s scope is limited to knowledge of other selves. In this sense, Fabbianelli’s introduction highlights the importance of Einfühlung in Lipps’s thought insofar as it constitutes the ultimate explanatory foundation of the relationship between individual subject and individual object—not necessarily another I—before understanding grasps both moments. In this sense, we can speak of an «alogical» relationship (prior to actual knowledge) between the subject and the object. This alogical or irrational character of Einfühlung is due to the object’s uniqueness to which, and thanks to it, the self unites. Insofar as the conception of reality underlined here is radically different from a logical-rational explanation of reality, Fabbianelli believes that the «irrationality» of Einfühlung comes into play.

Yet, by putting his concept of Einfühlung at the center of Lipps’s philosophical reflection, Fabbianelli’s introduction insists on the need to consider it in a broader context, namely, with a new Kantian conception of the problem related to the conditions of possibility for knowing the world. Faced with other more or less established interpretations that reproach Lipps for having offered a psychological interpretation of this problem, Fabbianelli joins authors such as Glockner, who maintain that Lipps must be considered a thinker who follows in the classical German philosophical tradition insofar as he discovers the condition of possibility for the synthesis of subject and object in the alogical relation of empathy.[ii] In this sense, Lipps endeavored to clarify the relationship between psychology and transcendental philosophy, showing how psychological reflection goes hand in hand with a transcendental philosophical approach. However, according to Fabbianelli, the primacy of psychology in Lipps is not the same as psychologism. In fact, he sees in Lipps a separation between psychology and psychologism insofar as he insists on keeping the subject and object separate, that is, the self and the world. Fabbianelli also references the fact that Lipps himself repeatedly rejected accusations of psychologism such as the vigorous criticism contained in the first volume of Husserl’s Logical Investigations. He based his rejection of this psychologism reproach on a clear separation between what constitutes the laws of thoughtful reason and what pertains to the mere empeiria self. According to Fabbianelli, Lipps always establishes a connection with transcendental philosophy through Fichte, insofar as there is a parallel between projecting oneself on the other (sich hineinversetzen, sich hineinverlegen), which according to Lipps happens with Einfühlung, and the constitution of the world that, according to Fichte, the self carries out. Without entering into detailed discussion here, Fabbianelli’s argument defending the plausibility of considering the relationship between man and reality as transcendental does not seem to me entirely convincing. The transcendental nature of this relationship is such in so far as it does not deal with objects, «but [with] the form and way in which objects can be known.»

In any case, to the extent that Lipps gives Einfühlung a transcendental meaning as the productive emergence of the other (human and nonhuman), Einfühlung cannot be understood as an accurate synonym of empathy. The English concept that Titchener introduced belongs to a different semantic realm since it characterizes feeling the other’s psychic state as a foreign state in oneself, while Einfühlen, for Lipps, is, rather, a fühlen by which I feel myself in the other (human or not). When I experience Einfühlung a kind of sich hineinverlegen or sich hineinversetzen occurs such that I project part of myself in the external other. Thus, when I consider that a landscape is melancholic or that a friend’s voice is cheerful, it is not that the landscape itself denotes melancholy or that my friend’s voice is actually happy. Melancholy and happiness are, rather, subjective moments, properties of my self—Ichbestimmtheiten in Lipps’ terms— that, in some way, are felt in that landscape and in that voice. I feel, therefore, melancholy in the landscape object and happiness in my friend’s voice object. It is not that I feel melancholic or happy and then «put» (hineinverlege) melancholy or joy into the landscape or into my friend’s voice, but rather that I live or feel these things in the landscape and in my friend’s voice. This does not merely involve representation. When I hear my friend’s voice, I do not represent the happiness that it contains, but rather I experience it (Cf. Einfühlung, Mensch und Naturdinge, p.60). It is precisely this co-rejoicing (sich Mitfreuen) that Lipps calls Einfühlung. Thus, for Einfühlung, what we could call «subjective» is perceived as residing in the object that is before me, that is, not in the object as it is in itself, but in the object as it is presented to me (Cf. Zur Einfühlung, page 375). As Zahavi pointed out to Lipps, » To feel empathy is to experience a part of one’s own psychological life as belonging to or in an external object; it is to penetrate and suffuse that object with one’s own life.»[iii] In this way, Einfühlung, insofar as I live in it in the object, is, as Fabbianelli points out, Einsfühlung or the fusion of the self with the object (Cf. Zur Einfühlung, page 419).

The aesthetic origin of Einfühlung reveals that it is not limited to knowledge of other selves alone. For the aesthetic object, the sensible realm “symbolizes” that is has content at the level of the soul (selfish). This object is thus «animated» and, as a result, it becomes an aesthetic object and a carrier of aesthetic value (Cf. Einfühlung, Mensch und Naturdinge, p 53). The important thing here is that the sensible appearance of a beautiful object is not the foundation of aesthetic taste, which rather corresponds to the self feeling happy, moved, etc. before the object (Cf. Einfühlung, innere Nachahmung und Organempfindungen, p.35). In short, when considering the beautiful object the self feels free, active, vigorous, etc. in the object.

Now, how, according to Lipps, does this living in another object take place, be it in a physical object or another self? Lipps believes it happens in a way that, ultimately, is not explicable and that he calls instinct or impulse (see, for example, Einfühlung, Mensch und Naturdinge, p. 67ff, and Einfühlung als Erkenntnisquelle, p. 362). By virtue of this instinct, my apprehension of certain sensibly perceived processes instinctively inspires a feeling in me, a desire that, with the act of apprehension, constitutes a single experience of consciousness. In relation to this point, Fabbianelli endeavors to show in his introduction that the instinctive element that Einfühlung contains in Lipps’ thought has to be understood in the broader context of his conception of the knowledge of reality as ultimately based on instinct (Cf. Egoismus und Altruismus, p. 213) In this way, Lipps’ concept of instinct could be related to that of Fichte (Trieb). For his part, Lipps refers to what he calls «instinct of empathy,» arguing that they involve two components: an impulse directed toward imitation and another aimed at expression. In the past, I have been happy and then experience an instinctive tendency toward expressing happiness. This expression is not experienced as supplementary to happiness, but rather as an integral part of that feeling. When I see the same expression in another place, I have an instinctive tendency to imitate or reproduce it, and this tendency evokes the same feeling that, in the past, was intimately connected with it. When I experience this feeling again, it will be linked to the expression I perceive and projected onto it. In short, when I see a happy face, I reproduce an expression of happiness, which will then evoke a feeling of happiness in me and I will attribute this felt happiness, which is co-given with perceived facial expressions, to the other.

Lipps research on empathy concludes with a series of interesting analyses that deserve more space and time than the present contribution permits. I refer, for example, to the relationships between Einfühlung and the feeling of value, its so-called «sociological» repercussions, etc. Here I will only refer to two of them, namely, the different types of Einfühlung and the distinction between positive Einfühlung and negative Einfühlung.

Lipps distinguishes five different types of Einfühlung. First, he refers to what he calls general apperceptive Einfühlung (allgemeine apperzeptive Einfühlung), which occurs when, for example, I think I perceive that a straight line widens, narrows, etc. when, in reality, it ultimately involves activities carried out personally and that, in a way, we apprehend in the line in question. Secondly, as analyzed in an example above, we sometimes talk about the peace a landscape projects, the passion of a given work of art, etc. Certainly, peace, passion, etc. are not visible in the same way that qualities of a color, its hue, its degree of saturation, etc. are. In reality, I feel peaceful or impassioned. However, I «see,» in a certain sense, peace and passion as residing in the landscape or work of art, which communicate peace and passion to me. This is called Stimmungseinfühlung. A third type of Einfühlung is the so-called «empirical» or «empirically conditioned apperceptive» type. This happens when, for me, a force or a motor activity «resides» in a natural event, as when I observe a stone’s gravitational tendency towards the earth or its resistance to the action another body inflicts on it, etc. Fourth, it is possible to identify Einfühlung in human beings’ sensible appearance (Einfühlung in die sinnliche Erscheinung des Menschen). This is also known as Selbstojektivation because, in it, Eingefühlte is the «I» with feelings, along with all its modes of activity. In fifth and last place, Lipps identifies a type of Einfühlung in certain data related to sensible perception, which, after Einfühlung itself, we can identify as expressions of a conscious individual. An example of this is when a gesture that I see and that I later identify as a human face contains an affect such as, for example, worry or joy.

As reflected in the various texts included in this volume, among which the unpublished article mentioned above is especially relevant, the term Einfühlung expresses a curious fact, namely, a way of experiencing myself, of experiencing a property of my self in a sensibly perceived or perceivable object as residing in such an object. This involves the fact that the subject or a property of his is «objectified» by my conscience or «projected» into an object. Now, as Lipps believes, it would be a mistake to understand this objectification or projection in the sense of a process that takes place in consciousness as if I had an idea of ​​one of its properties objectified or projected onto an object and then, so to speak, this idea passes from me to the object or becomes a property of the object in question. In Einfühlung, rather, what I in principle know as a property of the self appears to me in a given case as residing in an object that is nothing like the self. This is precisely why Lipps speaks of a property of the self «projecting» onto an object.

A second particularly noteworthy aspect to take up here is the distinction between positive Einfühlung (also called sympathetic Einfühlung) and negative Einfühlung (Cf. Einfühlung, Mensch und Naturdinge, pp. 83ff, and In Sachen der Einfühlung, p. 260ff). Starting with the latter, let us consider the case of offensive behavior on the part of another subject. A sort of Einfühlung would emerge even in this case. We tend to experience said behavior in ourselves, although we may be, at the same time, inwardly opposed to that tendency. This for Lipps is negative Einfühlung. The same thing happens when someone asserts a judgment that contradicts my knowledge. Upon hearing it, my knowledge activates and directs itself against said judgment. I deny it. This supposes that judgment co-exists with other judgment, i.e., that I have a tendency to judge in the same way. My rejection of judgment then forces me to accept judgment. It is a negative intellectual shared experience, a negative intellectual Einfühlung. On the contrary, for positive Einfühlung, the life of consciousness that seems to come from outside coincides with my activation tendencies. Thus, my consciousness accepts the life of another’s consciousness. I experience this with harmony rather than contradiction, as a confirmation of myself. These distinctions deserve better explanation regarding the difficult problem of the influence of non-intellectual, affective conditions in Einfühlung.

As mentioned, there are many aspects that this 700-page collection of Lipps’s writings on Einfühlung highlights. The richness of Lipps’ analysis deserves special attention and involves analyses oriented toward a faithful description of the different phenomena that give rise in consciousness. Brief summaries do not suffice in this case; rather, it requires a clear effort to be faithful to what is given and as it is given. This is what, as Lipps notes, philosophy should be made of. Thus, it would make sense to defend a positivist philosophy in the sense of a philosophy built on experience, a philosophy whose main task is, on the one hand, to separate what is proper to consciousness from what corresponds to the object of sensible perception and, on the other hand, to inquire into the extent to which certain data in my conscience are apprehended as residing in objects.

In short, with the publication of these texts, Faustino Fabbianelli not only made an important contribution to research on the phenomenological conception of Einfühlung, but also to a systematic and ordered study of a genuine philosophical problem. Lipps’ texts on Einfühlung gathered in this volume show, therefore, the unfairness of Husserl’s qualification of some of them as a «refuge of phenomenological ignorance.”


[i] “The Knowledge of other egos,” transl. by M. Cavallaro. Edited and with an introduction by Timothy Burns, in The New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy, XVI, Phenomenology of Emotions, Systematical and Historical Perspectives. Edited by R. Parker and I. Quepons, Routledge, Oxon, 2018 p. 261-282.

[ii] Cf. Glockner, H., “Robert Vischer und die Krisis der Geisteswissenschaften im letzten Drittel des neunzehnten Jahrhunderts. Ein Beitrag zur Geschichte des Irrationalitätsproblems,” Logos. Internationale Zeitschrift für Philosophie der Kultur, XIV, 1925, p. 297-342.

[iii] Zahavi, D., Self and Other: Exploring Subjectivity, Empathy, and Shame. Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2014, p. 104.

Anthony Feneuil, Yves Meessen, Christophe Bouriau (Ed.): Le transcendantal: Réceptions en mutations d’une notion kantienne, Presses universitaires de Nancy – Editions Universitaires de Lorraine, 2018

Le transcendantal: Réceptions en mutations d'une notion kantienne Book Cover Le transcendantal: Réceptions en mutations d'une notion kantienne
Anthony Feneuil, Yves Meessen, Christophe Bouriau (Ed.)
Presses universitaires de Nancy - Editions Universitaires de Lorraine
2018
Paperback 12,00 €
208